Nuclear Security Matters

27 Items

Blog Post - Views on the Economy and the World

Recap: What History Says about the Current Tax Bill

| Dec. 13, 2017

Congress is expected any day now to pass a really awful tax bill. If you want to understand why economists are confident that the tax cuts will not pay for themselves and why Republicans are disingenuous to claim otherwise, I recommend what Jason Furman and Larry Summers have been writing, e.g. in this column in the Washington post.

 

Copies of President Donald Trump's fiscal 2018 federal budget are laid out ready for distribution on Capitol Hill on May 23, 2017 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais).

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

How Aging, Inequality and China Make the U.S. Government Likely to Get Larger

| Sep. 12, 2017

Speaking at an event organized by Robert Greenstein, president of the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, I argued last week that unless our values have changed profoundly in an anti-government direction, the balance of pressures from economic change will lead to an expansion of the federal budget relative to gross domestic product. This was also the conclusion of a paper released by Paul Van de Water of the center. Excellent summaries were provided by Al Hunt and David Leonhardt.

National Economic Director Gary Cohn walks from Marine One across the South Lawn to the White House on Aug. 30 (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Cohn is Getting It All Wrong on Taxes

| Sep. 05, 2017

Given recent controversies, I was interested to read National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn’s answer to a “why are you staying?” question put by Stuart Varney of the Fox Business Network last week. To his credit Cohn did not back away from his reservations about the president’s response to the Charlottesville violence. He said “Look, tax cuts are really important to me. I think it’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. We haven’t done tax cuts in 31 years. So, to be a part of an administration that gets something done that hasn’t been done for 31 years is enormously challenging, enormously interesting to me.

House Speaker Paul Ryan discusses tax reform during a visit to Intel in Hillsboro, Ore. on Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

AP Photo/Don Ryan

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Tax Reform and Budget Deficits in America

| Aug. 29, 2017

The Republican Party’s leaders in the United States House of Representatives have been hard at work for more than a year designing a major reform of personal and corporate taxes. With an election looming in 2018, the House Republicans are determined to deliver a reform package and send it to the Senate for enactment.

Budget Director Mick Mulvaney speak to the media about President Donald Trump's proposed fiscal 2018 federal budget in the Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Trump's Magic Budget

| May 29, 2017

"U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration has now released its budget plans for fiscal year 2018. Among the details provided in the document, entitled America First – A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again, are projections for the expected path of gross federal debt as a percentage of GDP, which is shown to decline from its current level of about 106% to about 80% in 2027. Debt held by the public is expected to mirror this path, shrinking from 77% to 60% over this period....Unfortunately, neither projection is credible."

Budget Director Mick Mulvaney holds up a copy of President Donald Trump's proposed fiscal 2018 federal budget as he speaks to members of the media in the Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Larry Summers: Trump’s budget is simply ludicrous

| May 23, 2017

"Apparently, the budget forecasts that U.S. economic growth will rise to 3.0 percent because of the administration’s policies — largely its tax cuts and perhaps also its regulatory policies.  Fair enough if you believe in tooth fairies and ludicrous supply-side economics."

Nicholas Burns (r) and Seth Moulton

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

Analysis & Opinions - Future of Diplomacy Project, Belfer Center

Conversations in Diplomacy: Congressman Seth Moulton

| Mar. 27, 2017

In this installation of Conversations in Diplomacy, Congressman Seth Moulton, Representative of the Sixth District of Massachusetts, military veteran, and graduate of the Harvard Kennedy School, discusses the most serious threats to U.S. national security with Ambassador Nicholas Burns, Faculty Director of the Future of Diplomacy Project.