Environment & Climate Change

2209 Items

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Analysis & Opinions - Arctic Today

Frozen Superhighway: How Arctic Indigenous Organizations Can Embrace the Internet

  • Vincent Lowney
| Feb. 16, 2018

The economic opportunities in the North are leading to greater investment in infrastructure. As part of this growth, internet connections are emerging in previously disconnected communities. This connectivity is not equally distributed nor is it a priority for all governments, but as internet connection becomes more and more central to the modern world, indigenous communities will be presented with increasing opportunities to use it for their benefit.

Solar panel field and wind turbines

PIXNIO / hpgruesen

Book - Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc.

Handbook of the International Political Economy of Energy and Natural Resources

| 2018

This Handbook offers a comprehensive overview of the latest research from leading scholars on the international political economy of energy and resources. Highlighting the important conceptual and empirical themes, the chapters study all levels of governance, from global to local, and explore the wide range of issues emerging in a changing political and economic environment.

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Analysis & Opinions - Arctic Today

Could an Arctic Agreement Revolutionize Global Trade?

  • Mehek Sethi
| Feb. 09, 2018

While traditional trade agreements tend to neglect environmental regulatory cooperation, an Arctic Free Trade Area, including all eight Arctic Council member countries (Canada, the Kingdom of Denmark — including Greenland and the Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States), could set a new and revolutionary precedent.

East Asia as seen from space


Report - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

International Cooperation in East Asia to Address Climate Change

| February 2018

The Harvard Project on Climate Agreements has released a volume of fifteen briefs examining approaches to international cooperation in East Asia to address climate change. Most authors were participants in a research workshop conducted by the Harvard Project on September 27, 2017, and the volume builds upon the discussions in that forum. Authors are social scientists (economists, political scientists) and legal scholars who have studied climate-change policy, plus several policy practitioners. They are based in Japan, New Zealand, the People’s Republic of China, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of Singapore, the United Kingdom, and the United States.