Economics & Global Affairs

677 Items

Blog Post - Views on the Economy and the World

An Economic Platform for the Democrats

| May 29, 2018

Democrats are gearing up for the November mid-term elections, in which they hope to take back the US House of Representatives. Candidates are finding that the voters are not necessarily paying close attention to foreign affairs or even Trump scandals, and are more concerned about “pocketbook issues.” The conventional wisdom still stands: underlying the shock election of Mr Trump was the worry by the median household that it has been left behindby globalization and technological change and that the gains have been going to the rich instead.

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

An Economic Platform for U.S. Democrats

| May 29, 2018

A driving force behind Donald Trump’s election as US president was the median household’s perception that it had been left behind by globalization and technological change. Fortunately, from an economist’s perspective, it isn’t difficult to think of proposals that would expand the economic pie and distribute the slices more equitably.

Tehran Vali Asr

Tasnim News

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

How Iran Will Respond to New Sanctions

| May 02, 2018

Even before US President Donald Trump began threatening to re-impose sanctions on Iran, foreign investors looking to do business there were wary. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani failed to get his pro-market agenda off the ground, and now international political developments are playing into Iranian hardliners' hands.

Central Bank of Iran

Tasnim News

Analysis & Opinions

Did Bad Economic Conditions Cause Iran’s protests?

| Mar. 01, 2018

Like other Iranian president before him, President Hassan Rouhani is having a bad second term. Only six months after his decisive re-election, protesters were in streets shouting “Death to Rouhani.” Then came a sharp fall in the value of the rial, by 10% in two weeks, which threatens to undo the principal economic achievement of his first term—lowering inflation—and his plans to lower interest rates. Iran’s Central Bank had to increase interest rates last month to stop the fall of the rial. These are precarious times for Rouhani, who has won two elections promising economic revival.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell gestures while he testifies to the House Financial Services Committee on Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

The Fed Should Be Careful What It Wishes For

| Feb. 28, 2018

Empirical relationships in economics are sufficiently fragile that there is even a “law” about their failure. As British economist Charles Goodhart explained in the 1980s, “any observed statistical regularity will tend to collapse once pressure is placed upon it for control purposes.” Central banks in advanced economies have recently been providing a few more case studies confirming Goodhart’s Law, as they struggle to fulfill their promises to raise inflation to the stable plateau of their numerical targets.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and British Prime Minister Theresa May gesture ahead of a meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing. February 1, 2018 (Wu Hong/Pool Photo via Associated Press).

Wu Hong/Pool Photo via Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - Institut Montaigne

Brexit: What’s Next for the China-UK Relationship?

| Feb. 19, 2018

During her recent visit to China, Prime Minister Theresa May emphasized one fact: after leaving the EU, "we - the United Kingdom - will be free to strike our own trade deals". As a first step towards a post-Brexit commercial agreement, the UK and China signed a “joint trade and investment review”, which is quite different from a trade agreement (hardly possible while the UK remains part of the EU). Meanwhile, £9 billion deals were signed.

Iran US America Flag

Wikimedia

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Recognizing the Limitations of American Influence in Iran

| Feb. 14, 2018

It is time for a reality check: despite claims to the contrary by Iran’s supreme leader, the United States is not the central actor in the drama that recently unfolded in Iran, nor was it the central actor in Egypt back in 2011. The mass protests that forced the Egyptian dictator from power were driven by the Egyptian public’s growing disenchantment with decades of political, economic and social mismanagement by a succession of military rulers. Contemporary observers noted with surprise the absence of references to the United States or other foreign-policy considerations during the protests. The demonstrators’ recurrent chant—“bread, freedom, social justice and human dignity”—encapsulated the domestic motivations behind the public’s mobilization.

Rouhani

Tasnim News

Blog Post - Iran Matters

A Wake-up Call to Rouhani

    Author:
  • Masoud Movahed
| Jan. 17, 2018

The recent protests in Iran are surely a wakeup call for President Rouhani. To respond the legitimate grievances of low-income Iranian households, the Rouhani government should do its best to further diversify the Iranian economy and to bolster its manufacturing and industrial sectors. The Rouhani government should also promote the export of non-oil products, following the models of countries such as South Korea, Taiwan, and recently, the Chinese leviathan. Labor-intensive industries as well as service sectors like information technology, ought to be solidified. Rouhani should call upon state-directed industrial committees and agencies to provide Iranian entrepreneurs and manufacturers with fiscal resources, and he should foster financial support and protection for firms that place emphasis on exporting goods abroad.

French President Emmanuel Macron, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands after a joint press briefing at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Jan. 9, 2018 (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, Pool).

AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, Pool

Analysis & Opinions - Institut Montaigne

Macron’s Travel Diaries - First Step: China

| Jan. 08, 2018

Macron’s decision to start off the year with a trip to China carries a symbolic weight, which adds a special aura to his arrival in Beijing. Elected in May by 66% of the French electorate and supported by a strong parliamentary majority, the President was able to assert his power and authority. A quality much appreciated by Chinese leaders, who are astounded by Angela Merkel and Theresa May’s fragility, despite their respective successes in their countries’ parliamentary elections.