Economics & Global Affairs

50 Items

Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and British Prime Minister Theresa May gesture ahead of a meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing. February 1, 2018 (Wu Hong/Pool Photo via Associated Press).

Wu Hong/Pool Photo via Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - Institut Montaigne

Brexit: What’s Next for the China-UK Relationship?

| Feb. 19, 2018

During her recent visit to China, Prime Minister Theresa May emphasized one fact: after leaving the EU, "we - the United Kingdom - will be free to strike our own trade deals". As a first step towards a post-Brexit commercial agreement, the UK and China signed a “joint trade and investment review”, which is quite different from a trade agreement (hardly possible while the UK remains part of the EU). Meanwhile, £9 billion deals were signed.

French President Emmanuel Macron, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands after a joint press briefing at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Jan. 9, 2018 (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, Pool).

AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, Pool

Analysis & Opinions - Institut Montaigne

Macron’s Travel Diaries - First Step: China

| Jan. 08, 2018

Macron’s decision to start off the year with a trip to China carries a symbolic weight, which adds a special aura to his arrival in Beijing. Elected in May by 66% of the French electorate and supported by a strong parliamentary majority, the President was able to assert his power and authority. A quality much appreciated by Chinese leaders, who are astounded by Angela Merkel and Theresa May’s fragility, despite their respective successes in their countries’ parliamentary elections. 

Pigeons fly in front of the Euro sculpture at the old European Central Bank building in Frankfurt, Germany, on Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)

AP Photo/Michael Probst

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Monetary-Policy Normalization in Europe in 2018

| Dec. 22, 2017

When the European Central Bank’s Governing Council met on December 14, there was little to surprise financial markets, because no policy changes could be gleaned from public remarks. The previous meeting, in late October, had already set the stage for the normalization of monetary policy, with the announcement that the ECB would halve its monthly asset purchases, from €60 billion ($71 billion) to €30 billion, beginning in January 2018.

Natalie Jaresko at the Harvard Kennedy School.

Benn Craig

News

Natalie Jaresko dicusses her time as Finance Minister of Ukraine with Harvard's Future of Diplomacy Project

| Dec. 21, 2016

Natalie Jaresko (MPP ’89), former Finance Minister of Ukraine, returned to Harvard on October 31st, 2016 to take part in the Future of Diplomacy Project’s international speaker series. In a public seminar moderated by Faculty Director Nicholas Burns, Jaresko, who currently serves as chairwoman of the Aspen Institute Kyiv, reflected on her time in office from 2014 to 2016. In her two years in office, the Ukrainian government  had to contend with the Russian annexation of Crimea, a national debt crisis, widespread governmental corruption, and political instability.

Panel: What does Brexit mean for Europe's security architecture?

Thomas Lobenwein

Report

Brave new world? What Trump and Brexit mean for European foreign policy

| Dec. 08, 2016

On 24 and 25 November 2016 experts from politics and academia, including FDP Executive director Cathryn Clüver, discussed the impact of Brexit on several policy areas in a series of workshops at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin. All events took place under Chatham House rules.

British Prime Minister Theresa May and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte pose for the media ahead of their meeting in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Oct. 10, 2016.

(AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Theresa May’s Abbanomics and Brexit’s new class war

| October 10, 2016

“If you believe you’re a citizen of the world, you’re a citizen of nowhere. You don’t understand what the very word ‘citizenship’ means.”

Those were the key words of a speech by Prime Minister Theresa May of Britain, at the Conservative Party conference in Birmingham last week. My response — as a fully paid-up member of the rootless cosmopolitan class — was: Ooh la la!

Welcome to the new class war, Brexit edition.

On one side, the citizens of the world — the Weltbürger — who are only citizens in the sense that Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane was a citizen. We have at least two passports. We speak at least three languages. And we have at least four homes, not one of them in the town where we were born.