Economics & Global Affairs

324 Items

Uncovering the Domestic Factor in the Sino-Russian Energy Partnership

World Bank Photo Collection/Flikr

Journal Article - Taylor and Francis

Uncovering the Domestic Factor in the Sino-Russian Energy Partnership

| Oct. 15, 2018

The article outlines the role of national narratives in driving both Russia and China’s energy foreign policy and goes on to argue that the Sino-Russian gas breakthrough in 2014 was due to the peculiar way in which domestic factors paired with international circumstances to produce the outcome at that particular moment.

China shipping

Torsten Behrens/Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

China’s Rise as a Geoeconomic Influencer: Four European Case Studies

| Oct. 15, 2018

Over the past decade, China has become central to the world economy. Building on its economic successes, it is becoming increasingly central in world politics. China is also now more ambitious, aiming to establish itself as a regional as well as a global power. It is worth pointing out that the country’s economic rise is already challenging traditional geopolitics, despite a clear “divergence of views about how threatening this might be to traditional US dominance and agenda setting,” as Harvard scholar Tony Saich has put it.

In this photo taken on August 25, 2010, a bank clerk counts Chinese 100 Yuan notes in Shanghai. 

AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko

Analysis & Opinions - The Wall Street Journal

Currency Manipulation Isn’t Among China’s Trade Sins

    Author:
  • Jason Furman
| Oct. 15, 2018

The Trump administration is railing against Chinese currency manipulation without any regard for the yuan’s actual ups and downs. Yes, the numbers superficially back Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin’s warnings: The yuan has dropped about 10% against the dollar since mid-April, effectively offsetting the impact of U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods. But this doesn’t prove that China is defying the laws of market economics. In fact, Beijing is doing precisely the opposite.

Graham Allison on Bloomberg

Bloomberg

News - Bloomberg

China May Be On Collision Course with U.S., Harvard's Allison Says

| Oct. 04, 2018

Graham Allison, Douglas Dillon Professor of Government at Harvard Kennedy School, said in an interview with Bloomberg that China is rivaling the U.S. in virtually every domain. Because of the dynamic between these two powers, Allison warned that the future will be "extremely dangerous."

LNG Carrier

Wikimedia Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg Opinion

Chinese Tariffs on U.S. Energy Would Signal a New Attitude

| July 10, 2018

In placing retaliatory tariffs on certain goods and products, America’s trade partners have signaled how well they understand American politics. By targeting products from areas supportive of President Donald Trump, they clearly hope to generate pressure to lift U.S. tariffs or even create broader political problems for the president. But China is sending much more interesting — and complex — messages with its indication that it may place retaliatory tariffs on U.S. energy exports.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks during a news conference at the end of the Belt and Road Forum at the Yanqi Lake International Conference Center, north of Beijing on Monday, May 15, 2017. (Nicolas Asfouri/Pool Photo via AP)

Nicolas Asfouri/Pool Photo via AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Diplomat

China’s Debtbook Diplomacy: How China is Turning Bad Loans into Strategic Investments

| May 30, 2018

Through its Belt and Road Initiative, China is extending hundreds of billions of dollars in loans to developing countries that often can’t afford to pay them back. In doing so, Beijing may be looking beyond its bottom line, hoping to convert economic loss into geopolitical gain.

Photo of a container ship docked in Shangahi.

AP

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Debtbook Diplomacy

| May 24, 2018

The goal of this report is to analyze the future of debtbook diplomacy: which countries are vulnerable to Chinese coercion; how U.S. strategic interests will be impacted; and how U.S. policymakers can mitigate the effects of this strategy.