Economics & Global Affairs

589 Items

An American flag is flown next to the Chinese national emblem and flags during a welcome ceremony for visiting U.S. President Donald Trump outside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. November 9, 2017 (Andy Wong/Associated Press).

Andy Wong/Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - Cato Unbound

The Future of U.S.-China Relations Begins at Home

| Mar. 12, 2018

Kori Schake’s essay (and the book from which it is adapted) provides a serious, penetrating, and provocative invitation to debate the overriding geostrategic challenge of our time: what to do about the rise of China. Safe Passage is an outstanding example of the sort of work we champion at the Harvard Belfer Center’s Applied History Project. It illuminates current challenges by careful analysis of the historical record. And the case she examines in which the United States rose to rival and eventually surpass the British global hegemony is among the most instructive of the 16 cases in the Harvard Thucydides’ Trap case file for policymakers seeking to cope with the current U.S.-China competition.

In this March 10, 2018, photo, President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at Atlantic Aviation in Moon Township, Pa. Weeks after prodding lawmakers to stand up to the National Rifle Association,Trump is backing off his call for increasing the minimum age to buy an assault weapon — an idea strongly opposed by the NRA. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Analysis & Opinions - Globe and Mail

Trump Rules by Breaking the Rules

| Mar. 12, 2018

Over the past week - indeed, over the past year - U.S. President Donald Trump has broken one political rule after another. "When I signed up to be a conservative," an eminent Washington think-tanker said to me on Thursday, "I thought conservatism stood for free trade, fiscal responsibility and personal character." He might have added some firmness towards dictators.

President Donald Trump gives remarks at the Unleashing American Energy event at Energy Department headquarters, June 29, 2017. 

Simon Edelman, U.S. Energy Department

Analysis & Opinions - Christian Science Monitor

US seeks energy 'dominance.' But is that a shield against geopolitical risks?

| Feb. 22, 2018

The Trump administration has set the goal of US 'energy dominance' in world markets – and outlined the strategic benefits. Yet, while America's role is rising, its oil and gas exports are still modest compared with Saudi Arabia's and Russia's.

Solar panel field and wind turbines

PIXNIO / hpgruesen

Book - Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc.

Handbook of the International Political Economy of Energy and Natural Resources

| 2018

This Handbook offers a comprehensive overview of the latest research from leading scholars on the international political economy of energy and resources. Highlighting the important conceptual and empirical themes, the chapters study all levels of governance, from global to local, and explore the wide range of issues emerging in a changing political and economic environment.

Alibaba founder Jack Ma speaks during the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Meet the Man Poised to Take Over the World Economy

| Jan. 29, 2018

The most interesting man at Davos was not He Who Must Not Be Named. (In the style of the Harry Potter books, I’m going to omit the name of the Dark Lord, otherwise known as the president of the United States. To be frank, I’m bored of him.) No, the most interesting man at this year’s World Economic Forum was a rather scrawny 53-year-old former English teacher from Hangzhou in eastern China whose business is poised to take over the world economy: Jack Ma, the founder and chairman of Alibaba.

Symbolic pipes with a sign that reads "Turkmenistan—China" on exhibit at the Bagtyyarlyk natural gas field, Turkmenistan, Aug. 29, 2007.

AP / Alexander Vershinin

Analysis & Opinions - World Politics Review

In the Race for Central Asia’s Gas, China’s Rise Comes at Russia’s Expense

| Jan. 26, 2018

Last week, Kazakhstan’s president, Nursultan Nazarbayev, became the first Central Asian head of state to visit President Donald Trump in the White House, in a likely effort to shore up ties. In an email interview, Morena Skalamera, an associate at the Geopolitics of Energy Project at Harvard’s Belfer Center, examines the competition over Central Asia’s gas resources and its geopolitical consequences. 

French President Emmanuel Macron, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands after a joint press briefing at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Jan. 9, 2018 (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, Pool).

AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, Pool

Analysis & Opinions - Institut Montaigne

Macron’s Travel Diaries - First Step: China

| Jan. 08, 2018

Macron’s decision to start off the year with a trip to China carries a symbolic weight, which adds a special aura to his arrival in Beijing. Elected in May by 66% of the French electorate and supported by a strong parliamentary majority, the President was able to assert his power and authority. A quality much appreciated by Chinese leaders, who are astounded by Angela Merkel and Theresa May’s fragility, despite their respective successes in their countries’ parliamentary elections. 

People walk in Astana, Kazakhstan, on Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

AP Photo/Sergei Grits

Analysis & Opinions - The Brookings Institution

The New Geopolitics of Central Asia: China Vies for Influence in Russia's Backyard

| Jan. 02, 2018

Kazakhstan is a critical node and is now on the verge of China’s embrace. Not surprisingly, the government in Astana is keen to benefit from the project: It seeks to diversify its economy away from exporting oil and natural resources and wants to improve its road and rail infrastructures in order to expand its logistics sector. If successful, this could help Kazakhstan move from being a middle-income to a high-income country.