Economics & Global Affairs

13 Items

Analysis & Opinions - Gulf News

Western Strategy for a Declining Russia

| September 4, 2014

"Some of Russia's opponents may welcome the country's decline on the grounds that the problem will eventually solve itself, but that will be shortsighted. A century ago, the decline of the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires proved highly disruptive to the international system. A gradual decline, like that of ancient Rome or 18th-century Spain, is less disruptive than a rapid one, but ultimately the best scenario would feature a recovering and rebalanced Russia over the next decade."

Poland–Ukraine border crossing Krościenko-Smilnytsya, 20 Aug. 2011. Only the EU with its significant economic leverage can match the soft power rivalry with Russia.

Silar Photo, CC

Analysis & Opinions - GlobalPost

EU Can Be a More Effective Counter to Russia than US

| March 26, 2014

"Only the EU with its significant economic leverage can match the soft power rivalry with Russia. Unlike other revolutions such as the Arab Spring, the events in Ukraine are highly sensitive to external competition between foreign powers with stakes in the political course the country is taking."

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Generals, Make Way for the Lawyers

| October 8, 2012

"Blocking a company owned by foreign nationals from working on a domestic construction project is a striking move. It's been 22 years since any president has required a foreign company to divest all interests in an American project. These cases involve neither war nor diplomacy, but rather the other tools available to a president to protect American interests. We don't hear much about the lawyers these days, but legal and regulatory decisions are an essential aspect of national security strategy."

President Barack Obama delivers his Middle East speech at the State Department in Washington,  May 19, 2011.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

The End of the American Era

| November-December 2011

"...[T]he biggest challenge the United States faces today is not a looming great-power rival; it is the triple whammy of accumulated debt, eroding infrastructure and a sluggish economy. The only way to have the world's most capable military forces both now and into the future is to have the world's most advanced economy, and that means having better schools, the best universities, a scientific establishment that is second to none, and a national infrastructure that enhances productivity and dazzles those who visit from abroad. These things all cost money, of course, but they would do far more to safeguard our long-term security than spending a lot of blood and treasure determining who should run Afghanistan, Kosovo, South Sudan, Libya, Yemen or any number of other strategic backwaters."