Economics & Global Affairs

8 Items

Discussion Paper

Leapfrogging or Stalling Out? Electric Vehicles in China

| May 2014

China has ambitious goals for developing and deploying electric vehicles (EV). The stated intention is to “leapfrog” the auto industries of other countries and seize the emerging EV market. Since 2009, policies have included generous subsidies for consumers in certain locations, as well as strong pressure on local governments to purchase EVs. Yet four years into the program, progress has fallen far short of the intended targets. China has only about 40,000 EVs on the road, of which roughly 80% are public fleet vehicles such as buses and sanitation vehicles.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Belfer Center Newsletter Winter 2010-11

| Winter 2010-11

The Winter 2010/11 issue of the Belfer Center newsletter features recent and upcoming activities, research, and analysis by members of the Center community on critical global issues. This issue highlights a major Belfer Center conference on technology and governance, the Center's involvement in the nuclear threat documentary Countdown to Zero, and a celebration of Belfer Center founder Paul Doty.

 

Two cooling towers are demolished at a coal-burning power plant as an effort to improve energy efficiency in Xinxiang, in central China's Henan province, Oct. 28, 2009.

AP Photo

Presentation - Energy Technology Innovation Policy Project, Belfer Center

Promoting Energy Conservation in China: Findings from an Input‐Output Analysis of China's Energy Consumption

| November 9, 2010

The Chinese government consistently regards energy conservation as one of the most effective means to address its energy-related problems, such as energy security and greenhouse-gas emission reduction. Its energy-saving effect has been substantial since the government has implemented a series of policies in recent years. However, there is still debate about whether or not the current energy conservation policies can support the achievement of China's long-term goal of sustainable development.

Trucks are seen transporting coal at the Shaer Lake coal field in Shanshan county, Turpan, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, 13 Feb. 2009.

AP Photo

Journal Article - Energy Procedia

Driving Carbon Capture and Storage Forward in China

| February 2009

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), as an option in the portfolio of mitigation actions to combat climate change, is expected to have far-reaching implications for China. This paper (1) explores the strategic significance of CCS for China by making an extreme scenario analysis of Chinese power sector in 2030; (2) provides an overview of the recent CCS activities in China; and (3) identifies the major challenges with respect to CCS development in China and put forwards immediate strategies.

Book - Brookings Institution Press

Acting in Time on Energy Policy

| May 2009

Energy policy is on everyone's mind these days. The U.S. presidential campaign focused on energy independence and exploration ("Drill, baby, drill!"), climate change, alternative fuels, even nuclear energy. But there is a serious problem endemic to America's energy challenges. Policymakers tend to do just enough to satisfy political demands but not enough to solve the real problems, and they wait too long to act. The resulting policies are overly reactive, enacted once damage is already done, and they are too often incomplete, incoherent, and ineffectual. Given the gravity of current economic, geopolitical, and environmental concerns, this is more unacceptable than ever. This important volume details this problem, making clear the unfortunate results of such short-sighted thinking, and it proposes measures to overcome this counterproductive tendency.

Book Chapter

Acting in Time on Energy Policy

| May 2009

"The book's title—Acting in Time—refers to the persistent problem in U.S. energy policy that typically just enough is done to satisfy the short-term political imperatives, but not enough is done to actually solve the underlying problems themselves. As a result, many of the fundamental economic, environmental, and security-related challenges arising from patterns of U.S. energy production and consumption have become more intractable. Some now approach a point of crisis."

Journal Article - Energy Policy

Technical, Environmental, and Economic Assessment of Deploying Advanced Coal Power Technologies in the Chinese Context

| July 2008

The authors evaluate the differences in technical performance, environmental impact, and costs for capital and electricity for a variety of advanced coal power technologies based on the technological and economic levels in 2006 in China. This study investigates especially the economic gaps between Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle - the technology most able to capture CO2 at a relatively low cost - and other advanced coal power technologies.