Conflict & Conflict Resolution

2517 Items

A protest at the Embassy of Saudi Arabia about the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi

Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Here’s Why We Should Care About the Khashoggi Case

| Oct. 12, 2018

Finding out the truth about the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul and responding to it properly might seem to have little to do with the average American. Here’s why one diplomatic expert says the situation matters a lot.

Khashoggi was a legal permanent resident of the United States, Nicholas Burns said. “He’s a green card holder. He’s like lots of our relatives who first came to America who were in transition to become a citizen,” Burns said.

Ambassador Nicholas Burns discusses the Khashoggi case on BBC World News

BBC World News

Analysis & Opinions - BBC News

Khashoggi: Ex-US Diplomat and a Saudi Activist on Case

| Oct. 11, 2018

Prominent journalist and critic of the Saudi government, Jamal Khashoggi, walked into the country’s consulate in Istanbul last week to obtain some documents and has not been seen since. The authorities in Istanbul believe he was murdered by Saudi agents. Saudi Arabia insists that he left the consulate shortly after he arrived. Former diplomat and US Under-Secretary of State for Political Affairs, Nicholas Burns, told BBC Hardtalk's Stephen Sackur that because Mr Khashoggi was a permanent resident of the United States there was a direct interest of the US government to pressure the Saudi government to “tell the truth of what happened.”

Graham Allison on Bloomberg

Bloomberg

News - Bloomberg

China May Be On Collision Course with U.S., Harvard's Allison Says

| Oct. 04, 2018

Graham Allison, Douglas Dillon Professor of Government at Harvard Kennedy School, said in an interview with Bloomberg that China is rivaling the U.S. in virtually every domain. Because of the dynamic between these two powers, Allison warned that the future will be "extremely dangerous."

Rupert Murdoch attends the WSJ Magazine 2017 Innovator Awards at The Museum of Modern Art on Wednesday on November 1, 2017, in New York.

Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Analysis & Opinions - Sydney Morning Herald

'Culture of Fear': Murdoch, the ABC and How to Fix a Media in Crisis

| Oct. 02, 2018

So what should be done about the rolling crises washing over what remains of the Australian media? Rupert Murdoch has been up to his neck in the elevation and removal of Australian prime ministers for the better part of a decade. The ABC has seen the conservatives politicise its board, demolish its funding and pressure its management to get rid of troublesome journalists. And now we face the prospect of the disappearance of Australia’s longest, independent print masthead (Fairfax) as it is consumed by a television company (Nine) which is chaired by Peter Costello.

AP Photo/Andy Wong

AP Photo/Andy Wong

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

The China Tariff Mess

| Sep. 28, 2018

The cost to US consumers and firms imposed by tariffs on Chinese imports is not large relative to the gain that would be achieved if the US succeeds in persuading China to stop illegally taking US firms’ technology. But the Trump administration should state that this is the goal, and that the tariffs will be removed when it is met.

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Video

Event Video: Accompanying Unaccompanied Child Refugees: The Challenges Facing Advocates and Activists

Sep. 26, 2018

A panel discussion with Jacqueline Bhabha (FXB Center at HSPH), Sofia Kouvelaki (The Home Project, Athens), and Vidur Chopra (HGSE). Moderated by Melani Cammett (Harvard Government Department).

Co-sponsored by the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.

President Donald Trump speaking at the United Nations

New York Post

Analysis & Opinions - USA Today

Trump Touts 'America First,' Blasts Iran in United Nations address

| Sep. 25, 2018

UNITED NATIONS — President Donald Trump defined Iran in harsh terms during a major address to the United Nations on Tuesday, defending his administration's decision to pull the U.S. out the controversial 2015 nuclear agreement.

"Iran’s leaders sow chaos, death and destruction," Trump told representatives from more than 130 other countries meeting in New York. "Iran’s leaders plunder the nation’s resources to enrich themselves and to spread mayhem across the Middle East and far beyond."

Trump's remarks focused heavily on the concept of sovereignty over globalism, which he said the United States rejects. The "America first" remarks drew on a similar speech he delivered at last year's United Nations, but included more detailed examples of how that vision informs his policies on trade, immigration and the world's hot spots.

Blogtrepreneur/Flickr

Blogtrepreneur/Flickr

Journal Article - Nonproliferation Review

Solving the Jurisdictional Conundrum: How U.S. Enforcement Agencies Target Overseas Illicit Procurement Networks Using Civil Courts

| September 2018

Over the past two decades, the United States has increasingly turned to targeted sanctions and export restrictions, such as those imposed against Iran and North Korea, in order to curb the spread of weapons of mass destruction. One vexing problem, however, is how to contend with jurisdictional hurdles when the violations occur overseas, in countries that are unable or unwilling to assist US enforcement efforts. To solve this problem, US prosecutors are turning to strategies with significant extraterritorial implications—that is, exercising legal authority beyond national borders. One such tool is to use civil legal procedures to seize assets linked to sanctions or export-control violations in jurisdictions that lack cooperative arrangements with US enforcement agencies. While this may be an attractive strategy to bolster enforcement efforts against overseas illicit procurement, using such tools is not without consequence. This article explores the political, legal, and technical implications of enforcing extraterritorial controls against overseas non-state actors by exploring the recent uses of civil-asset forfeiture against Iranian and North Korean procurement networks.