Asia & the Pacific

3135 Items

China shipping

Torsten Behrens/Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

China’s Rise as a Geoeconomic Influencer: Four European Case Studies

| Nov. 15, 2018

Over the past decade, China has become central to the world economy. Building on its economic successes, it is becoming increasingly central in world politics. China is also now more ambitious, aiming to establish itself as a regional as well as a global power. It is worth pointing out that the country’s economic rise is already challenging traditional geopolitics, despite a clear “divergence of views about how threatening this might be to traditional US dominance and agenda setting,” as Harvard scholar Tony Saich has put it.

President Donald Trump Visits the American Cemetery of Suresnes, Outside Paris

NBC News

Analysis & Opinions - Los Angeles Times

Trump, Stung by Midterms and Nervous About Mueller, Retreats From Traditional Presidential Duties

| Nov. 13, 2018

For weeks this fall, an ebullient President Trump traveled relentlessly to hold raise-the-rafters campaign rallies — sometimes three a day — in states where his presence was likely to help Republicans on the ballot.

But his mood apparently has changed as he has taken measure of the electoral backlash that voters delivered Nov. 6. With the certainty that the incoming Democratic House majority will go after his tax returns and investigate his actions, and the likelihood of additional indictments by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, Trump has retreated into a cocoon of bitterness and resentment, according to multiple administration sources.

Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, left, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, second from left, Chinese Politburo Member Yang Jiechi third from right, and Chinese State Councilor and Defense Minister General Wei Fenghe, second from right, meet at the State Department in Washington, November 9, 2018.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The Next Great War

| Nov. 09, 2018

On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, the guns of World War I fell silent — and nearly 20 million people lay dead. Could such a conflict happen today? After more than seven decades without a shooting war between great powers, many Americans find the thought of the United States and a major adversary like China killing millions of one another’s citizens virtually inconceivable.

But when we say something is “inconceivable,” we should remember this: the realm of what is possible is not bound by what our limited minds can conceive. Today, the intensifying rivalry between a rising China and a ruling United States could lead to a war that neither side wants and that both know would be even more catastrophic than World War I.

US and Iranian flags

AFP

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

U.S. Reimposes Sanctions on Iran but Undercuts the Pain With Waivers

    Author:
  • Gardiner Harris
| Nov. 02, 2018

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration announced on Friday that it was exempting eight countries from bruising sanctions that the United States was reimposing against Iran, undercutting its pledge to economically punish Tehran’s regional aggressions while widening a profound rift with European allies.

Some Context for Canadians Who Love or Hate the New Nafta

Robert Linsdell/Flickr

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg Opinion

Some Context for Canadians Who Love or Hate the New Nafta

| Oct. 30, 2018

Americans are not the only ones still unpacking the new USMCA trade deal that is due to replace Nafta. Two issues have received a great deal of attention in Canada — one which is misunderstood as a great concession by Canada and the other wrongly celebrated as an unequivocal victory. Both deserve a deeper look.