Analysis & Opinions

5822 Items

Analysis & Opinions - Lawfare

Evaluating the U.K.'s ‘Active Cyber Defence’ Program

| Feb. 14, 2018

In November 2016, the U.K. government launched its Active Cyber Defence (ACD) program with the intention of tackling “in a relatively automated [and transparent] way, a significant proportion of the cyber attacks that hit the U.K.” True to their word, a little over a year on, last week the U.K.’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) published a full and frank account (over 60 pages long) of their progress to date. The report itself is full of technical implementation details. But it’s useful to cut through the specifics to explain exactly what ACD is and highlight its successes—how the program could benefit the United States as well.

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Wikimedia

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Recognizing the Limitations of American Influence in Iran

| Feb. 14, 2018

It is time for a reality check: despite claims to the contrary by Iran’s supreme leader, the United States is not the central actor in the drama that recently unfolded in Iran, nor was it the central actor in Egypt back in 2011. The mass protests that forced the Egyptian dictator from power were driven by the Egyptian public’s growing disenchantment with decades of political, economic and social mismanagement by a succession of military rulers. Contemporary observers noted with surprise the absence of references to the United States or other foreign-policy considerations during the protests. The demonstrators’ recurrent chant—“bread, freedom, social justice and human dignity”—encapsulated the domestic motivations behind the public’s mobilization.

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Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

The World After Trump

| March/April 2018 Issue

The warnings started long before Donald Trump was even a presidential candidate. For at least a decade, a growing chorus of foreign policy experts had been pointing to signs that the international order was coming apart. Authoritarian powers were flouting long-accepted rules. Failed states were radiating threats. Economies were being disrupted by technology and globalization; political systems, by populism. Meanwhile, the gap in power and influence between the United States—the leader and guarantor of the existing order—and the rest of the world was closing.

Staff members of Hanson Robotics control their company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. September 28, 2017 (Kin Cheung/Associated Press).

Kin Cheung/Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

The Machines Ate My Homework

| Feb. 12, 2018

Are we living through the re-mystification of the world?

Much that goes on around us is baffling these days. Financial market movements, for example, seem increasingly mysterious. Why, after close to a decade of sustained recovery from the nadir of early 2009, did global stock markets sell off so sharply this month?

U.S. United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, and Israel's U.N. Ambassador Danny Danon exchange handshakes

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Times of Israel

Israel is Fighting BDS the Wrong Way

| Feb. 12, 2018

Fifty years of efforts have failed to convince the international community of the merits of the settlement policy, which it considers counterproductive, first and foremost, to Israel’s own interest in maintaining its Jewish and democratic character and in achieving peace. No matter how much Israel invests in the battle against BDS and delegitimization, it will not be able to change the international image that Israel has come to bear the primary responsibility for the diplomatic impasse.

A member of Australia's Stolen Generation wipes tears away as they listen to Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd deliver his speech where he apologized to its indigenous people for past treatment that "inflicted profound grief, suffering and loss," in Canberra, Australia. February 13, 2008. (Mark Baker/Associated Press, Pool). Keywords: Australia, Stolen Generation, Aborigines, Kevin Rudd

Mark Baker/Associated Press, Pool

Analysis & Opinions - The Advertiser

Ten Years After Saying Sorry There Is Still Work to Do

| Feb. 08, 2018

It’s important to remember the National Apology didn’t come out of the blue. We had all seen the “Bringing Them Home Report” detailing the tragic stories of the Stolen Generations. This had led to the “Sorry Day” marches across the country where hundreds of thousands of Australians from all sides of politics said with a single voice it was time to say sorry. And as Leader of the Labor Party going into the 2007 election, I had said I would deliver a formal apology on behalf of the entire nation if I became Prime Minister. And that is what I did. For all of us.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis takes his seat for a hearing of the House Armed Services Committee

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Axios

Trump's Nuclear Review Could Trigger a Chain Reaction in Asia

| Feb. 08, 2018

"Just as U.S. nuclear strategy and arsenal expansions affect those of China, China's nuclear shifts affect India's threat perceptions. Pakistan, in turn, pays close attention to any growth in Indian nuclear forces. To avoid a nuclear chain reaction in Asia, Congress should take a stand against proliferation and refuse to fund these new weapons programs."

Exterior of a Wells Fargo bank location in Philadelphia on Friday, August 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Wells Fargo’s Board Members are Getting Off Too Easy

| Feb. 06, 2018

A question I am asked as frequently as any other is: “Why didn’t anyone go to jail for the financial crisis?” There was huge suffering, sufficient misbehavior that the largest banks had to pay well over $100 billion in fines, and in the past, people had gone to jail for financial shenanigans during the Depression and the S&L crisis. People are usually indignant as they ask the question.