Analysis & Opinions

6464 Items

A British soldier in field of red poppies.

Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Analysis & Opinions - Atlantic Council

100 Years Later: Reflecting on the Lessons of World War I

| Nov. 11, 2018

"An abiding lesson for the United States is that we must remain committed to Europe—to our democratic allies in NATO as well as to our strategic partnership with the European Union," writes Professor Nicholas Burns, Faculty Chair of the Belfer Center's Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship, in his reflection on the 100 years since the end of the First World War on November 11, 1918.

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

AP/Richard Drew

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Saudi Arabia Isn't Cuddly; Neither Is Iran

| Nov. 08, 2018

Chuck Freilich writes that while the international community has recently been consumed by the gruesome murder of a Saudi journalist, nothing really has changed. The Saudi regime has long been the most heinous on earth, but the overarching strategic considerations that have militated for ongoing cooperation with it continue to do so. The Iranian regime is no more attractive than the Saudi one, and its pursuit of regional hegemony and nuclear weapons make it the far greater danger. Iran must remain the primary focus of Israel's attention.

President Trump responding to a question by CNN's Jim Acosta during a press conference in the White House

Shawn Thew/EPA-EFE/REX Shutterstock

Analysis & Opinions - Deutschland Funk

"President Trump is Ready to Declare War on Congress"

| Nov. 08, 2018

Cathryn Clüver Ashbrook, Executive Director of the Belfer Center's Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship, spoke with Germany's national public radio Deutschlandfunk about the midterm elections, the current political division in the United States and discussed implications for Donald Trump's presidency.

President Donald Trump talks to the media before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House on November 9, 2018.

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

What Would the Ghosts of 1918 Tell Us About the Perilous World Today?

| Nov. 08, 2018

What would the ghosts of 1918 tell politicians a century later about the perilous world we inhabit today? I asked some of my historian friends to reflect on the lessons of 1918 for our post-election America. They cited some common themes: the fragility of the world order, then and now; the big, sometimes disastrous outcomes that can begin with small events at the margins; the moral hubris that dooms inflexible leaders to failure; and the humility that allows great leaders to see events through the eyes of adversaries, and thereby avert disaster.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Secretary of the Treasury Steve Mnuchin provide an update on the Trump administration's Iran policy at the Foreign Press Center in Washington, D.C., on November 5, 2018 (State Department via Flickr).

State Department via Flickr

Analysis & Opinions - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Not very SWIFT

| Nov. 06, 2018

Not only would sanctioning SWIFT be a major escalation in U.S. sanctions policy, but an entirely reckless decision. Realistically, enforcing sanctions against SWIFT would have significant consequences for both the U.S. and global financial system—upending decades of international norms.

A stack of Iranian rials and a stack of Euros (Ivar Husevåg Døskeland via Flickr/Creative Commons).

Ivar Husevåg Døskeland via Flickr/Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

International Anti-Money Laundering Reforms and Iran

| Nov. 06, 2018

Although it remains to be seen whether or not the Iran nuclear deal is salvageable, there are few incentives left for Iran to implement anti-money laundering reforms. For better or worse, the Financial Action Task Force and the future of the JCPOA have become politically intertwined as a consequence of US unilateral sanctions.

A video image of Hatice Cengiz, fiancee of slain Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Analysis & Opinions - Agence Global

The potential massive consequences of the Khashoggi murder

| Nov. 06, 2018

BEIRUT — Our continued focus on resolving the facts of the murder of Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul last month is important for four reasons that will impact the fate of the Middle East and U.S. policies there for years to come. We will know soon if the killers are held accountable or the world loses attention, succumbs to the allure of the fortunes of oil and gas, and leaves largely unchanged the current power structures of our region. Which of those routes we take will determine whether we generate a more decent, participatory, accountable, and just region, or fall into a death maelstrom of unchallenged and cruel autocracy where money and guns rule, and citizens enjoy neither rights nor humanity.

Early voters lining up to vote in Minnesota in 2018

AP Photo/Jim Mone

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Hackers are using malware to find vulnerabilities in U.S. swing states. Expect cyberattacks.

| Nov. 05, 2018

The Pentagon has launched a preemptive strike against the Russian hackers who may have attacked the 2016 presidential election with social media influence campaigns. Numerous initiatives, including Harvard University’s Defending Digital Democracy Project, have educated officials on how to fortify elections against cyberattacks and encouraged social media companies to take down fake accounts. Despite these efforts, 67 percent of Americans consider that a foreign influence campaign, either by Russia or other governments, during the midterm elections is “very or somewhat” plausible.

A makeshift memorial on Saturday outside the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, where 11 people were fatally shot on Oct. 27. (Keith Srakocic/AP)

Keith Srakocic/AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

We’ve declared war on foreign terrorism. Why not do the same for domestic threats?

| Nov. 05, 2018

In the span of a week, our nation experienced a torrent of hate-fueled attacks: the slaying of two African Americans in a Kentucky supermarket , the  mail-bomb assassination attempts and the mass slaying in a Pittsburgh synagogue . These attacks tragically demonstrate that domestic terrorism is on the rise as political polarization and hateful echo chambers on social media radicalize people.

As we mourn those who died in Kentucky and Pittsburgh, we should recognize that such tragedies highlight a dangerous counterterrorism gap that has developed over time: an insufficient focus by the federal government on the threat of domestic terrorism.

US and Iranian flags

AFP

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

U.S. Reimposes Sanctions on Iran but Undercuts the Pain With Waivers

    Author:
  • Gardiner Harris
| Nov. 02, 2018

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration announced on Friday that it was exempting eight countries from bruising sanctions that the United States was reimposing against Iran, undercutting its pledge to economically punish Tehran’s regional aggressions while widening a profound rift with European allies.