Analysis & Opinions

6710 Items

US President Trump Calls the Findings of the Mueller Report a ‘Complete and Total Exoneration'

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

Mueller Report Clears President Trump — but Not President Putin

| Mar. 25, 2019

President Trump is off the hook. Russian President Vladimir Putin isn’t. That seems a fair, concise reading of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, at least as summarized Sunday by Attorney General William Barr. Understandably, the first half of this formulation is getting the most attention right now, but the second half is equally important for America’s leaders and citizens to keep in mind in the months ahead.

Progress in the trade talks between Donald Trump and Xi Jinping has been difficult

Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Image

Analysis & Opinions - The Guardian

Donald Trump and Xi Jinping are Missing a Trick over Trade

| Mar. 24, 2019

President Donald Trump has postponed until at least April the supposed deadline for concluding the United States’ trade negotiations with China. A good outcome for both sides would be reached if China agreed to protect property rights better and reduce the state’s role in its economy; the US agreed to strengthen national saving and public investment; and both sides agreed to reverse their recent tariff increases. Unfortunately, this is not the deal that is likely to materialise.

A global ransomware attack, as shown from the perspective of a computer user in Beijing, May 13, 2017.

Mark Schiefelbein (AP)

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The Mueller Report Won't Fix the Problem Underlying It All

| Mar. 21, 2019

The Mueller report will have fiery consequences—of that, one can be sure. But it won't solve the larger cybersecurity dilemmas facing the American public, David Ignatius warns. And although the military recently began launching counteroffensives against cyber attacks, more steps are urgently needed from other sectors of American society.

U.S. Attorney for District of Massachusetts Andrew Lelling

AP Photo/Steven Senne

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Americans Don’t Believe in Meritocracy — They Believe in Fake-it-ocracy

| Mar. 18, 2019

Americans believe in meritocracy in principle. Polls show that significant majorities — between 67 percent and 70 percent since Gallup began asking the question in 2003 — believe that, when it comes to university admissions, “applicants should be admitted solely on the basis of merit.” Yet in practice Americans don’t believe in meritocracy at all. A significant number of wealthy Americans have no problem at all with the idea of hereditary privilege, so long as they are spared the social obligations of traditional aristocracy.