286 Items

North Korea leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump shake hands

AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Analysis & Opinions - The Diplomat

Could a ‘Big Freeze’ Be Trump’s Path to a Nobel Prize?

| July 11, 2019

By turning established diplomatic practice on its head and making an unscheduled stop to shake hands with Kim Jong Un in the DMZ, President Trump demonstrated his readiness to go the extra mile and beyond to meet the challenge his predecessor, Barack Obama, told him would define his presidency.

Artworks featuring U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are displayed at a gallery in Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Vincent Yu (AP)

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Misunderstanding Trump's "Failed" Hanoi Summit

| Mar. 01, 2019

In spite of the vociferous reaction of the American press, Graham Allison argues, the "failed" U.S.-North Korea summit in Vietnam this past week may not be such a failure after all. To understand why, one has to look to history—and especially to similar denuclearization efforts led by Ronald Reagan.

A man in Seoul, South Korea watches the latest news about the tense relationship between Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un, May 2, 2017.

Ahn Young-joon (AP)

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

North Korea and America’s Second Summit: Here’s What Graham Allison Thinks Will Happen

| Feb. 07, 2019

What should Americans expect as the 2019 summit between the North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un and U.S. President Donald Trump approaches? In this piece, Graham Allison cautions that for the U.S. to make the most of the summit, President Trump should be careful not to define the national interest too narrowly.

The Chinese flag displayed at the Russian booth of import fair.

(AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

China and Russia: A Strategic Alliance in the Making

| Dec. 14, 2018

THE YEAR before he died in 2017, one of America’s leading twentieth-century strategic thinkers, Zbigniew Brzezinski, sounded an alarm. In analyzing threats to American security, “the most dangerous scenario,” he warned, would be “a grand coalition of China and Russia…united not by ideology but by complementary grievances.” This coalition “would be reminiscent in scale and scope of the challenge once posed by the Sino-Soviet bloc, though this time China would likely be the leader and Russia the follower.”

Trump and Kim at summit

AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Grading the Singapore Summit: Compared to What?

| June 15, 2018

In the hyperpolarized state of American politics and policy debate, both critics and supporters of the Trump administration have become so predictable that they are now background noise. If required to summarize my assessment of the Trump-Kim summit in one line, it would be: oversold and undervalued. Despite their best efforts, his critics haven’t come close to matching Trump’s preposterous claim that “There is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea.”

President Donald Trump shakes hands as he meets with Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong on Monday, June 11, 2018, in Singapore. Trump is scheduled to attend a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on June 12, 2018. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Analysis & Opinions - Politico Magazine

A Bettor’s Guide to the Trump-Kim Summit

| June 10, 2018

On Monday night at 9 p.m. Eastern—9 a.m. Tuesday morning in Singapore—Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un will finally meet face to face. The daily swirl of insults and compliments as these two adversaries circle each other before the summit is dizzying. If this were a heavyweight boxing match, we’d need a bettor’s guide before wagering on the outcome.

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Journal Article - PRISM - National Defense University

Nuclear Terrorism: Did We Beat the Odds or Change Them?

| May 15, 2018

It has been more than 13 years since the publication of Nuclear Terrorism: the Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe, which sounded the alarm about the clear and present danger of nuclear terrorism. The book made the case for two seemingly contradictory propositions: first, on the current path, nuclear terrorism is inevitable; second, nuclear terrorism is preventable by an agenda of actions that are feasible and affordable. Juxtaposition of these propositions presented a paradox that the book attempted to resolve.