58 Items

Photo of Presidents Trump and Xi during meeting on sidelines of G20, June 29, 2019.

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Could the United States and China Be Rivalry Partners?

| July 07, 2019

The strategic rationale for the relationship between the United States and China has collapsed. After a quarter century in which American presidents sought to integrate a rapidly developing China into the American-led international order, the United States has concluded that what it thought was a “strategic partner” is in fact a “strategic adversary.” After decades of keeping its head down following Deng Xiaoping’s injunction to “hide and bide,” Xi Jinping’s China has discarded that cloak and become increasingly assertive.

Magazine Article - Le Figaro

Les États-Unis et La Chine Se Dirigent Tout Droit Vers La Guerre

| May 03, 2019

Le piège de Thucydides se met en place quand une puissance émergente vient défier la puissance régnante. Ainsi hier Athènes face à Sparte. Et peut-être demain Pékin face à Washington. Telle est la thèse de Graham Allison, professeur émérite à Harvard et conseiller de plusieurs secrétaires d'État à la Défense, dans son livre devenu un best-seller mondial.

(The Thucydides Trap takes place when an emerging power threatens to displace a ruling one. Long ago, in antiquity, it was Athens against Sparta. But tomorrow, it could be Beijing against Washington. Such is the argument made by Graham Allison, emeritus professor at Harvard and advisor to several Secretaries of Defense, in his best-selling book Destined for War: Can America and China Escape the Thucydides Trap? - This English translation from original French by Christian Gibbons, Belfer Center)

commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the start of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and China, January 10, 2019.

Mark Shiefelbein (AP)

Analysis & Opinions - The Cipher Brief

State Secrets: China Expert Professor Graham Allison

| Feb. 11, 2019

After being named the number 1 national security threat to the United States in a report by the leaders of the U.S. Intelligence Community, China's relationship with America seems more vital than ever to international peace and security. In this podcast, China expert Graham Allison recounts what he's learned about how these two world powers can avoid going to war.

The American flag flies alongside a Chinese national symbol as President Donald Trump is welcomed to a summit in Beijing, November 9, 2017.

Andy Wong (AP)

Speech - Asia Society Policy Institute

The Avoidable War: Reflections on U.S.-China Relations and the End of Strategic Engagement

| January 2019

The Asia Policy Institute recently released a collection of speeches by its President and former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd about the rivalry between China and the United States. In his forward to the collection, Graham Allison explains why relations between the two countries have become "the defining issue of international relations in the 21st century", and why Kevin Rudd is uniquely equipped to provide insight into them. Read on for both the full introduction and the full report.

"Within the covers of this book, long-time China watcher and former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd has provided an analytic snapshot that would normally only be available to the president or prime minister of a major nation. In substance, it would be the envy of the best professional intelligence agency."

Russian and Chinese flags sit side by side on a table in the Great Hall of the People, Beijing, on June 8, 2018.

(AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Analysis & Opinions - The Wall Street Journal

A Sino-Russian Entente Again Threatens America

| Jan. 29, 2019

Former national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski warned in 1997 that the greatest long-term threat to U.S. interests would be a “grand coalition” of China and Russia, “united not by ideology but by complementary grievances.” This coalition “would be reminiscent in scale and scope of the challenge once posed by the Sino-Soviet bloc, though this time China would likely be the leader and Russia the follower.”

Photo of a man arranging magazines near newspapers with the headlines of China outcry against U.S. on the detention of Huawei's chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou, at a news stand in Beijing, Monday, Dec. 10, 2018

(AP Photo/Andy Wong)

Analysis & Opinions - Axios

Huawei Arrest Marks Escalation in the U.S.–China Fight over 5G

| Dec. 21, 2018

The U.S.-directed arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou in Canada sounds an alarm for the increasingly contentious dynamic between China and the U.S.

Why it matters: When it comes to 5G, Huawei is the fastest horse in a thinning race, with potential to gain a monopoly in the next decade. But the U.S. has now launched a global campaign against the company without a serious domestic alternative for 5G infrastructure.

 

The Chinese flag displayed at the Russian booth of import fair.

(AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

China and Russia: A Strategic Alliance in the Making

| Dec. 14, 2018

THE YEAR before he died in 2017, one of America’s leading twentieth-century strategic thinkers, Zbigniew Brzezinski, sounded an alarm. In analyzing threats to American security, “the most dangerous scenario,” he warned, would be “a grand coalition of China and Russia…united not by ideology but by complementary grievances.” This coalition “would be reminiscent in scale and scope of the challenge once posed by the Sino-Soviet bloc, though this time China would likely be the leader and Russia the follower.”

Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, left, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, second from left, Chinese Politburo Member Yang Jiechi third from right, and Chinese State Councilor and Defense Minister General Wei Fenghe, second from right, meet at the State Department in Washington, November 9, 2018.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The Next Great War

| Nov. 09, 2018

On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, the guns of World War I fell silent — and nearly 20 million people lay dead. Could such a conflict happen today? After more than seven decades without a shooting war between great powers, many Americans find the thought of the United States and a major adversary like China killing millions of one another’s citizens virtually inconceivable.

But when we say something is “inconceivable,” we should remember this: the realm of what is possible is not bound by what our limited minds can conceive. Today, the intensifying rivalry between a rising China and a ruling United States could lead to a war that neither side wants and that both know would be even more catastrophic than World War I.

Finished up the Staff section of the List-building project Media Tracking (Factiva, Google) Op-Ed Tracking (NYT, WaPo) Formatted Sanger and Graham op-eds in CMS Formatted Volcker, Tabatabai, and Summers quotes in Word Formatted Frankel and Walt op-eds in InDesign Rotated the board (Tried) to clean up the Op-Ed Media Expansion spreadsheet (this still needs to be made to look more tidy) Held a small meeting with Sharon Formatted Burns TV interview quote

AP Images

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

America and China: Destined for Conflict or Cooperation?

| July 30, 2018

Graham Allison discusses the future of relations between the United States and China in response to a request from The National Interest. Allison was one of 14 China experts who gave their assessments on whether the U.S. and China are destined for conflict or cooperation.