Energy

7 Items

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Video - Institut d'études internationales de Montréal

Global Diplomacy Lab 2016 : la Ville intelligente comme diplomate numérique (The smart city and the new role of cities as digital diplomats)

| Dec. 08, 2016

Cathryn Cluver, Executive Director of the Future of Diplomacy Project, is featured at the 2016 Montreal Global Diplomacy Lab. Her remarks explore the increasing important role of cities in international relations and the new capabilities of data-driven smart cities. 

New York Times reporter Coral Davenport speaking at the event "Controversy! A Reporter’s Perspective On Global Climate & Energy Debates."

Benn Craig

News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Climate Change: The Story About Everything

    Author:
  • Casey Campbell
| February 18, 2016

For journalism, the 21st century is an era where public trust drops yearly, and reporters face competition to reach a growing Internet audience. Adding these challenges to a beat as controversial and global as climate and energy policy creates a job that seems near impossible.

The New York Times’ Energy and Environment Correspondent Coral Davenport confronts these challenges head-on by covering environmental policy in a way that goes beyond the conventional boundaries of Washington-based reporting to the larger, all-encompassing impact of climate change issues on a human and dollars-and-sense scale.

Chinese President Xi Jinping is displayed on a big screen in Beijing as Chinese battle tanks roll by during a Sept. 3, 2015 parade commemorating the 70th anniversary of Japan's surrender during World War II.

(AP Photo)

Magazine Article - The Atlantic

The Thucydides Trap: Are the U.S. and China Headed for War?

| September 24, 2015

The defining question about global order for this generation is whether China and the United States can escape Thucydides’s Trap. The Greek historian’s metaphor reminds us of the attendant dangers when a rising power rivals a ruling power—as Athens challenged Sparta in ancient Greece, or as Germany did Britain a century ago. Most such contests have ended badly, often for both nations, a team of mine at the Harvard Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs has concluded after analyzing the historical record. In 12 of 16 cases over the past 500 years, the result was war. When the parties avoided war, it required huge, painful adjustments in attitudes and actions on the part not just of the challenger but also the challenged.