Energy

7 Items

Natalie Jaresko at the Harvard Kennedy School.

Benn Craig

News

Natalie Jaresko dicusses her time as Finance Minister of Ukraine with Harvard's Future of Diplomacy Project

| Dec. 21, 2016

Natalie Jaresko (MPP ’89), former Finance Minister of Ukraine, returned to Harvard on October 31st, 2016 to take part in the Future of Diplomacy Project’s international speaker series. In a public seminar moderated by Faculty Director Nicholas Burns, Jaresko, who currently serves as chairwoman of the Aspen Institute Kyiv, reflected on her time in office from 2014 to 2016. In her two years in office, the Ukrainian government  had to contend with the Russian annexation of Crimea, a national debt crisis, widespread governmental corruption, and political instability.

French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault, third right front, and German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, fourth right front, stand in front of a bridge that was destroyed by shelling during the battle for Slovyansk in summer 2014, in Seleznivka village, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016.

Stringer/Photo via AP

Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

European Security Reform Holds Key to Breaking Stalemate in Ukraine

| Oct. 27, 2016

"To some it might seem that the devil is in the details of the February 2015 agreement, but, in my view, the heart of the impasse lies in the bigger picture: I believe that the primary reason the signatories to Minsk-2 keep locking horns over the fine print is that none of them—not Ukraine, not Russia, not the West—can be certain that their real minimal requirements for security will be met."

FDP Senior Fellow Douglas Alexander speaking on "Brexit"

Bennett Craig, Belfer Center

Analysis & Opinions - Los Angeles Times

Brexit would hurt U.S.

| March 21, 2016

On June 23, the United Kingdom will decide whether it should remain part of the European Union. The early polls suggest that not only the Conservative government, but the whole country, is split. Future of Diplomacy Project senior fellow and former MP, Douglas Alexander, explains why a vote for Brexit would leave the whole European project at risk of unraveling at precisely the time new economic and security threats confront the West.

Chancellor of Germany Angela Merkel speaks at a joint news conference at the White House in February

Michael Kappeler, EPA

Analysis & Opinions

Merkel's Moment of Power and Partnership with America is Right Now

| Feb. 16, 2015

The Future of Diplomacy Project Executive Director, Cathryn Clüver, writes about German leadership and the chance for increased U.S.-German partnership in the face of multiple crises. In this article for Quartz, Clüver argues that dramatic events unfurling around TTIP, ISIS, and Ukraine could spell the "start of a turning tide" in U.S.-German relations under the guidance of "the most powerful woman in the world," German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

The United States and the European Union on Wednesday, April 2, 2014 vowed to help Ukraine in its efforts to gain more independence from Russian energy supplies and are working to wean Europe off an over-reliance on gas from Moscow.

AP Images

Analysis & Opinions - The Brookings Institution

Don’t Make Ukraine About Energy

| May 2, 2014

As tensions in Ukraine continue to rise, G7 countries have decided to impose new sanctions on Russia. Sanctions targeting the energy sector, which account for roughly 25 percent of Russian GDP and half the country's budget revenues, have increasingly gained support. Yet, energy sanctions are not the way to go, as the price will be too high—not for Russia, but for Europe. Instead, policy strategies should aim at disentangling energy from indisputable security aspects surrounding the Ukraine crisis.