Energy

114 Items

Journal Article - Progress in Nuclear Energy

By Accident or by Design? Pushing Global Governance of Nuclear Safety

| August 2017

Nuclear safety governance should move towards a more robust regime including elements of international monitoring and verification. This is needed because nuclear energy production is likely to grow and new reactors will have different global dispersal, veering towards less experienced countries. In addition, there is growing interest in international and multilateral collaboration on disposal of mounting nuclear waste.

Book - Cambridge University Press

The Ethics of Nuclear Energy: Risk, Justice and Democracy in the Post-Fukushima Era

| August 2015

Despite the nuclear accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi plant in Japan, a growing number of countries are interested in expanding or introducing nuclear energy. However, nuclear energy production and nuclear waste disposal give rise to pressing ethical questions that society needs to face. This book takes up this challenge with essays by an international team of scholars focusing on the key issues of risk, justice and democracy. The essays consider a range of ethical issues including radiological protection, the influence of gender in the acceptability of nuclear risk, and environmental, international and intergenerational justice in the context of nuclear energy

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Where Should Nuclear Waste be Dumped?

| May 26, 2015

MTA/ISP Research Fellow Behnam Taebi and former Research Fellow and Associate Kathleen Araújo explore lessons learned from early adopters of consent-based processes in nuclear waste decisions. They argue, whatever waste sites are evaluated, public consent must more fully be taken into account for there to be any chance of durable buy-in.

Journal Article - Taylor and Francis Journal of Risk Research

Socio-Technical Challenges of Nuclear Power Production and Waste Management after Fukushima

This special issue of the Journal of Risk Research, guest edited by Behnam Taebi and Ibo van de Poel presents a number of papers that deal with the socio-technical challenges of nuclear power production and nuclear waste management in the post-Fukushima era, from nuclear power as a climate mitigation strategy to the participatory turn in radioactive waste management and responsible risk communication.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, is seated with U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, during the Arctic Council Ministerial Session at City Hall in Kiruna, Sweden, May 15, 2013

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

A Seat at the Arctic Table

| May 16, 2013

"...[T]he Arctic Council agreed to let nations that, at last look at the map, are not located anywhere near the Arctic, join as observers. It may seem a diplomatic nicety, but it is the recognition that the Arctic Council nations no longer have a monopoly on the region. China, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, and Singapore are on a hunt for more energy and have their eyes on the waning polar ice caps."

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Safety vs. Recovery after Disasters

| March 11, 2013

"March 11, 2011, was three distinct disasters. The earthquake and tsunami fell into the category of tragedies that are often unavoidable. But the nuclear accident requires a different analytical frame, and proponents of nuclear energy shouldn't be allowed to write off the Fukushima crisis as a natural disaster. Since the industrial revolution, there have always been industrial harms. As societies require more of technology, engineering, and transportation, there will be blips in the systems. What isn't inevitable, however, is that they happen again."

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Shell's Arctic Troubles Only Buy Time

| January 10, 2013

"...[T]o believe that the market will maintain its current risk assessment forever is to believe in the power of magical thinking. The economic and political stakes are overwhelmingly in favor of drilling. The White House is pushing for domestic sources of energy. Alaska's elected and tribal leadership will gain much from taxes on new economic activity. And our foreign competitors near the Arctic circle — including Russia, which sent an oil tanker through the Arctic during in December — are ready to plunge into the cold."

Analysis & Opinions - WBUR

Debate Dominated By Issues Important To Voters In Swing State Ohio

| October 17, 2012

"...[T]he subtext of this second presidential debate was all Ohio, all the time. At every opportunity the two candidates came back to the three C's that matter in Ohio — cars, China and coal. If this seemed a little strange to everyone else in the country it made perfect sense in the dynamic of this campaign....By the time the second debate rolled around last night, though Obama still held an edge in the electoral college, the race had gotten so close that it looked like it was coming down to who could win Ohio."

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Energy Policy Shows Fallacy of a 'Domestic' Debate

| October 1, 2012

"But nowhere is the divide between domestic and foreign so artificial than in the area of energy policy. It is in this arena that the debates over domestic fracking, environmental harms, dependency on foreign oil, geopolitical threats, global warming, melting glaciers, and a host of other head-scratching policy problems come together — proving that the distinction, in Wednesday's debate, between domestic and foreign policy is about as definitive as sand on the shoreline."