Middle East & North Africa

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Analysis & Opinions - War on the Rocks

Between Multistakeholderism and Sovereignty: Cyber Norms in Egypt and the Gulf States

| Oct. 12, 2018

The difficulty of reaching global agreement on cyber norms is generally attributed to a bipolar division in cyber security governance, reflecting two opposing political systems and sets of values. On one hand, there is a group of what experts have called “likeminded” states. This group generally includes the United States and European countries, and it believes in an open and free internet driven largely by global market competition with some government regulation and civil society observation (known as multistakeholderism). The second group includes Iran, Russia, and China, and prioritizes state control over national “borders” in cyber space with strict governmental limits on content (known as cyber sovereignty.) These differences have been described as the cyber space element of a resurgent Cold War, in which neoliberal and democratic structures confront information control, authoritarianism, and rule-breaking.

A protest at the Embassy of Saudi Arabia about the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi

Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Here’s Why We Should Care About the Khashoggi Case

| Oct. 12, 2018

Finding out the truth about the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul and responding to it properly might seem to have little to do with the average American. Here’s why one diplomatic expert says the situation matters a lot.

Khashoggi was a legal permanent resident of the United States, Nicholas Burns said. “He’s a green card holder. He’s like lots of our relatives who first came to America who were in transition to become a citizen,” Burns said.

Ambassador Nicholas Burns discusses the Khashoggi case on BBC World News

BBC World News

Analysis & Opinions - BBC News

Khashoggi: Ex-US Diplomat and a Saudi Activist on Case

| Oct. 11, 2018

Prominent journalist and critic of the Saudi government, Jamal Khashoggi, walked into the country’s consulate in Istanbul last week to obtain some documents and has not been seen since. The authorities in Istanbul believe he was murdered by Saudi agents. Saudi Arabia insists that he left the consulate shortly after he arrived. Former diplomat and US Under-Secretary of State for Political Affairs, Nicholas Burns, told BBC Hardtalk's Stephen Sackur that because Mr Khashoggi was a permanent resident of the United States there was a direct interest of the US government to pressure the Saudi government to “tell the truth of what happened.”

John Bolton speaking at the gathering of the People's Mujahedin of Iran in front of headquarters of the United Nations, New York City

VOA Persian

Blog Post - Iran Project Iran Matters

US-Led Regime Change is not the Path

    Author:
  • Sina Toossi
| Oct. 11, 2018

For much of Iran's modern history, the Iranian people have been divided on issues such as traditionalism versus modernity and the nature of their relationship with the West. These divisions only highlight the need for organic political change to allow society to find common ground. However, outside political interventionism has been a constant setback, whether during the Constitutional Revolution period, the 1953 US/UK coup, or now with Trump's exhortations and actions.

Judges enter the International Court of Justice

AP/Peter Dejong

Analysis & Opinions - Lawfare

What to Make of the ICJ's Provisional Measures in Iran v. U.S. (Nuclear Sanctions Case)

| Oct. 04, 2018

Elena Chachko analyzes the October 3, 2018 ruling by International Court of Justice on a case in which Iran sought fully re-instated sanctions relief from the United States, which was part of the framework of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. 

Sovereign Venture Capitalism: At a Crossroad

StockSnap/Pixabay

Analysis & Opinions - The Economist

Sovereign Venture Capitalism: At a Crossroad

| Oct. 03, 2018

What the Iron Man-like character is claiming for his futuristic automotive company is not unheard of. On a systemic basis, mammoth institutional investment—especially from sovereign wealth funds (SWFs)—is flowing into start-ups and technology-oriented publicly traded companies. In this case, Saudi billions would help Mr Musk escape the pressures of being publicly listed. SWFs have invested large sums into high-growth start-ups promising innovation and financial returns. In fact, just this month, Saudi’s Public Investment Fund (PIF) announced a US$1bn investment in Tesla’s rival, Lucid, and a US$2bn stake in Tesla. The rise in SWF balance sheets and activity is having ramifications on global efforts to be more Silicon Valley-like, and on Silicon Valley itself.