Analysis & Opinions

5911 Items

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Analysis & Opinions - Philadelphia Inquirer

Abolishing ICE is a very bad idea

| Mar. 23, 2018

There has been an increasing drumbeat from progressives arguing in favor of abolishing or defunding U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, for instance in a recent column for the Inquirer and during an interview with Sen. Kamala Harris (D., Calif.). In essence, activists are arguing that ending ICE should be the position of the Democratic Party and a litmus test for its presidential candidates. This is a bad idea.

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Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

How the U.S. Can Play Cyber-Offense

| Mar. 22, 2018

The focus on cyber-deterrence is understandable but misplaced. Deterrence aims to change the calculations of adversaries by persuading them that the risks of an attack outweigh the rewards or that they will be denied the benefits they seek. But in seeking merely to deter enemies, the United States finds itself constantly on the back foot. Instead, the United States should be pursuing a more active cyberpolicy, one aimed not at deterring enemies but at disrupting their capabilities. In cyberwarfare, Washington should recognize that the best defense is a good offense.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani attend a joint news conference


Analysis & Opinions - Atlantic Council

US Pressure is Pushing Iran Closer to Russia and China

| Mar. 22, 2018

"...Iran's turn toward China and Russia leave the United States with less leverage for future negotiations on any issue, making it less and less likely for Iran to agree to cooperate with the United States or its allies. Thus, it is crucial to rethink these policies and come up with a more feasible plan."

People watch a TV screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump, left, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, March 9, 2018.


Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Why the United States Might Accept a Nuclear North Korea

| Mar. 22, 2018

Many Americans were aghast at President Trump’s announcement this month that he would meet with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.

But in moving toward diplomacy, Trump is following in the steps of previous presidents. If he continues down their path, the end result would be a deal that allows Pyongyang to keep its nuclear weapons — not because Trump gets taken in by Kim, but because such a deal boosts American interests. Since World War II, the United States has labored to prevent nuclear weapons from spreading. But once a country has them, Washington ultimately accommodates it, opting to develop some kind of diplomatic influence, if not control, over other nuclear powers, instead of going to war.

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Jorge Caballero Jiménez

Analysis & Opinions - Judy Dempsey's Strategic Europe

Judy Asks: Is Social Media Above the Law?

| Mar. 21, 2018

Facebook and others were designed to evade the long arm of the law. For years, Facebook actively eluded U.S. laws, including the 1996 Communications Decency Act and the 2002 Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, neither of which anticipated the advent of social media. It has kept regulators at bay in part because of their lack of technical sophistication to understand its evolution into an algorithm-based, data-harvesting system.

Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech at the closing session of the annual National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Tuesday, March 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

AP Photo/Andy Wong

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

What the West Doesn’t Get About Xi Jinping

| Mar. 20, 2018

The recent decision by China’s National People’s Congress to abolish term limits for the office of the president has sent shock waves through the West: Xi Jinping, the current officeholder, is suddenly being described as a new Confucian autocrat, overseeing a state still governed by a Marxist-Leninist party, presiding over a selectively capitalist economy, with ambitions to make his country a global superpower.

Cpl. Edward Chin of the 3rd Battalion, 4th Marines Regiment, covers the face of a statue of Saddam Hussein with an American flag before toppling it in downtown in Baghdad on Wednesday, April 9, 2003. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)

AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File

Analysis & Opinions - Sydney Morning Herald

The Monstrous Strategic Mistake That Took Us to War in Iraq

| Mar. 20, 2018

John Howard’s decision to commit thousands of Australian troops to the invasion of Iraq 15 years ago ranks as one of the two great failures of Australian foreign policy since the Second World War.

The other is Menzies’ decision to send forces to Vietnam. Both cases represented an abysmal failure of Australian political leadership, driven by an unnecessary capitulation to strategically foolhardy decisions by the US administrations of the time.

Both decisions were taken without independent Australian analysis of the legitimacy of American war aims, the credibility of American military strategy to both win the war and secure the peace, as well as the long-term consequences for Australian national interests.

Greater Boston - Nicholas Burns


Analysis & Opinions - WGBH

Former NATO Ambassador On Trump’s Relationship With Putin

| Mar. 20, 2018

Vladimir Putin took a step closer to president-for-life status this week in Russia, winning a fourth term as president with more than 76 percent of the vote and not a single meaningful challenger against him. Today, President Donald Trump — whose campaign is still being investigated for potential collusion with Russia — said he called Putin to congratulate him and plan for a meeting in the “not-too-distant future.” In the room during that phone call was Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, who has been accused of war crimes in Yemen. Former U.S. ambassador to NATO, Nicholas Burns, also a former undersecretary of state, joined Jim Braude to discuss.