Audio

276 Items

Audio - War on the Rocks

War on the Rocks Podcast: The Big Cyber Spectacular

| Feb. 15, 2018

In our latest episode, Usha Sahay and Ryan Evans were joined by Thomas Rid, Michael Sulmeyer, and a mystery guest (ok, ok, it’s Corinna Fehst) to talk about cyber-security, election meddling, reports about U.S. intel agencies buying back pilfered hacking tools, going dark, legislatures as the vulnerable soft cyber underbelly of democracies, and the different threats posed by Russia and China.

Also, “Password1” is not a good password according to our guests. So you should probably change that.

AP Photo/Iranian Presidency Office, Mohammad Berno

AP Photo/Iranian Presidency Office, Mohammad Berno

News

Event Podcast: Ali Ahmad "Does the Middle East Really Need Nuclear Power?"

Feb. 08, 2018

Audio recording of a February 08, 2018 MEI Seminar with Ali Ahmad, Scholar In-Residence and Director, Energy Policy and Security in the Middle East Program, Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs, American University of Beirut.

Dr. Amanda Sloat presents at the Harvard Kennedy School

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

Analysis & Opinions - Future of Diplomacy Project

Conversations in Diplomacy: Amanda Sloat

| Feb. 06, 2018

In this installation of the 'Conversations in Diplomacy' podcast, Dr. Amanda Sloat, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Southern Europe and Eastern Mediterranean Affairs at the State Department, for a conversation on U.S.-Turkey relationship and the future of Syria with Faculty Director Nicholas Burns.

Audio - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall on Office Hours Podcast

| Feb. 01, 2018

Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall (@LSRTweets), former Deputy Secretary of Energy and Belfer Center Senior Fellow, talks with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about the mystery surrounding the Energy Department’s National Laboratories, the smart grid, the U.S. nuclear arsenal, energy sources of the future, and her favorite energy bar.

Analysis & Opinions

A Humpty Dumpty Europe, feat. Cathryn Clüver Ashbrook

| Feb. 01, 2018

As the clock ticks down to the United Kingdom’s Brexit, Cathryn Clüver Ashbrook considers the EU’s future and the delicate balance of 21st-century statecraft, including EU-US relations as well as negotiation practice, international conflict mitigation and the impact of technology and communication on diplomatic and non-governmental actors. Hosted by the World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth

Rachid Ghannouchi, leader of the Tunisian moderate Islamist Ennahda Party, addresses members of the media after voting at a polling station in Ben Arous, Tunisia, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014.

AP Photo/Aimen Zine

News

Event Podcast: Andrew March "From Islamic Democracy to Muslim Democracy: Islamist Ideology in Post-Revolutionary Tunisia"

Jan. 31, 2018

Audio recording of a January 31, 2018 MEI Seminar with Andrew March, Berggruen Fellow-in-Residence, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard University and Visiting Fellow, Islamic Legal Studies Program: Law and Social Change, Harvard Law School.

Audio - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Ash Carter on Office Hours Podcast

| Jan. 03, 2018

Ash Carter, the 25th Secretary of Defense and the Director of the Belfer Center, talks with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about how he connected the technology industry with the Defense Department through DIUx, the tensions between the President and his cabinet, and what lessons we can learn from medieval history.

Audio - National Review Online

For the Defense: Ash Carter

| Dec. 07, 2017

Ash Carter is a physicist and a defense-policy expert, having served in government periodically for decades. He was secretary of defense from 2015 to 2017. He has spent his academic career at Harvard, where he is today. In this “Q&A,” Jay Nordlinger asks him about some of the biggest issues: nuclear proliferation, North Korea, Iran, the size of the U.S. military. He also asks about the relation between our servicemen and the general American population. Is there too great a gulf between them? Do people sentimentalize our military? Is it okay to say “Thank you for your service”?