10 Upcoming Events

Dr. I.P. Park, LG Electronics president and CTO, ushers in the future of Artificial Intelligence while delivering the LG Pre CES keynote address.

Jack Dempsey/AP Images for LG Electronics

Seminar - Open to the Public

Responsible AI: A Guide to the Future

Wed., Jan. 23, 2019 | 9:30am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Taubman Building, Nye A, B, & C, 5th Floor

Join us for a discussion on “Responsible AI: A Guide to the Future” with Joi Ito, Director of the MIT Media Lab and a panel of distinguished speakers working on innovative and emerging AI-based technologies. This event is sponsored by the Harvard Belfer Center's Technology and Public Purpose (TAPP) Project
 

Map of Cold War–era Europe showing countries that received Marshall Plan aid. The blue columns show the relative amount of total aid per state.

Wikimedia CC

Seminar - Open to the Public

Borrowed Power: Financial Origins of Grand Strategy

Thu., Jan. 24, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Daniel Z. Jacobs, Grand Strategy, Security, and Statecraft Fellow, International Security Program

What are the sources of grand strategy, the relationship of national power to national interest? Answers to this question tend to emphasize domestic interests, cultural and ideational impulses, state capacity, or the distribution of military power. The speaker, however, argues that it is a state's ability to harness the wealth of others that shapes both what the state wants (i.e., national interest) and how the state goes about getting it (i.e., national power).

The core component of this argument is financial power; that is, the costs a state pays to facilitate public spending through borrowing. When these costs are relatively high, the state is likely to define its national interest narrowly and rely for its security on the self-correcting nature of the balance of power. By contrast, when the costs of borrowing are relatively low, the state will take a broader view of its national interest. As a result, the state is likely to reshape the balance of power in its favor and attempt to preserve this newfound distribution. Overall, scholars and policymakers can say that as a state's financial power rises, its grand strategy becomes increasingly ambitious.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Governing AI — How Do We Do It?

Wed., Jan. 30, 2019 | 8:00am - 9:00am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Mr. Tommy Ahlers, Minister of Higher Education and Science, Kingdom of Denmark

Moderators: Professor John P. Holdren, Co-Director, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and Professor Daniel Schrag, Co-Director, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

Please join us for an open discussion over breakfast on the usage and potential of artificial intelligence (AI) and the legislative challenges that usage of such new technology entails. The minister will present the challenges that he is wrestling with in this field and afterwards open up the floor for discussion.

Please RSVP to patricia_mclaughlin@hks.harvard.edu by 4 PM, Tuesday, January 29, 2019.

Vladimir Putin & Donald Trump at the 2017 G-20 Hamburg Summit

Wikimedia Commons

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

"Everything You Wanted to Know but Were Afraid to Ask About Russian Espionage"

Wed., Jan. 30, 2019 | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Malkin Penthouse, 4th Floor

The Intelligence Project will host the Spring Semester kick-off seminar from 12:00-1:30pm in the Malkin Penthouse. Lunch will be provided on a first come, first served basis. Panelists will include:

General (Ret) James R. Clapper, Former Director of National Intelligence

Rolf Mowatt-Larssen, Intelligence Project Director; Former Department of Energy Director of Intelligence & Counterintelligence; Former CIA Division Chief; Former CIA Chief of Station

Paul Kolbe, Former CIA Division Chief; Former CIA Chief of Station

BG (Ret) Kevin Ryan, Former Defense Attache to Russia; Founder, US-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism; Founder, Elbe Group

 

 

In this Dec. 5, 2014 photo, Ibrahim Doghri smokes a cigarette in his low-income neighborhood of Mhamdiya near Tunis, Tunisia, as he talks about how his friends went to fight in Syria.

AP Photo/Paul Schemm

Seminar - Open to the Public

Great Expectations or Nothing to Lose? Socio-economic Correlates of Joining the Islamic State

Wed., Jan. 30, 2019 | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Wexner Building, 434 A-B

A seminar with Steffen Hertog, Associate Professor of Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics. Moderated by Melani Cammett, Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs, Department of Government, Harvard University and MEI Faculty Affiliate.

Oxfam distributing water in the Horn of Africa during a severe drought, 24 February 2011.

Wikimedia CC/Oxfam

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Nexus between Internationalism and Localism in Civil Conflict: Insurgents' Policy toward Humanitarian Access

Thu., Jan. 31, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Ayako Kobayashi, Research Fellow, International Security Program

Why do some rebel groups restrict international humanitarian access to areas under their control, while others allow it? Some scholars posit that rebels strategically comply with international humanitarian law to legitimize their status in the international arena. Others underline the importance of exploring interactions between non-state armed groups and local populations from which protection norms may emerge. This interdisciplinary project will fill the gap between the internationalism and localism by proposing a new typology of rebel groups, addressing conditions under which rebels are more likely to allow humanitarian access, and through case studies illustrating the theory.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Crypto: A Look at the Current State of the Controversy

Mon., Feb. 4, 2019 | 12:15pm - 1:30pm

1 Brattle Square - Suite 470

Join the Cybersecurity Project for a lunch talk on "Crypto: A Look at the Current State of the Controversy" with Professor Susan Landau, Bridge Professor of Cyber Security and Policy in the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and the School of Engineering, Department of Computer Science, Tufts University.

 

Lunch will be served on a first come, first served basis.

Book Cover of Prisoner: My 544 Days in an Iranian Prison

Amazon

Seminar - Open to the Public

Prisoner: My 544 Days in an Iranian Prison

Thu., Feb. 7, 2019 | 8:30am - 10:00am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Taubman Building, Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor

Professor Nicholas Burns will moderate a discussion with Jason Rezaian who was arrested by Iranian police, accused of spying for America when he was the Washington Post's Tehran bureau chief. Rezaian will speak about his eighteen-month imprisonment and the  tense diplomatic situation it caused as chronicled in his new book Prisoner: My 544 Days in an Iranian Prison.

U.S President Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev at the Hofdi House in Reykjavik, Iceland, during the Reykjavik Summit, 11 October 1986.

The Official CTBTO Photostream

Seminar - Open to the Public

Nuclear Abolitionism and the End of the Cold War

Thu., Feb. 7, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Stephanie Freeman, Ernest May Fellow in History & Policy, International Security Program

During most of the Cold War, U.S. and Soviet officials built a broad consensus among their publics that nuclear weapons provided essential security by deterring the actions of hostile states. In the 1980s, however, the radical goal of nuclear abolition enjoyed staunch support from both grassroots movements across the globe and the leaders of the two superpowers, Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev. This presentation will examine nuclear abolitionists' influence on the trajectory of the Cold War's last decade, from 1979 to 1989. It will assess anti-nuclear activists' impact on elite decision-makers and consider how their shared interest in nuclear disarmament transformed U.S. and Soviet foreign policy in the 1980s. This talk will demonstrate that nuclear abolitionists played a decisive yet unappreciated role in ending the Cold War.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

event

Seminar - Open to the Public

Politics of Modern Middle Eastern Art

Thu., Feb. 7, 2019 | 4:15pm - 5:30pm

A seminar with Sultan Al Qassemi, Founder, Barjeel Art Foundation and 2018 Greenberg World Fellow, Yale University.