5 Events

event

Conference - Open to the Public

Avoiding Thucydides’s Trap: Managing the Rise of China

Thu., Mar. 23, 2017 | 9:00am - 2:00pm

Harvard Faculty Club

Keynote Speaker:
Dr. Seiichiro Takagi, Senior Fellow, Japan Institute of International Affairs

Welcome Remarks:
Dr. Gary Samore, Executive Director for Research, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Introductory Address:
Professor Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Panel Discussion:
Professor Joe Nye, Harvard Kennedy School
Professor Taylor Fravel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dr. Toshi Yoshihara, Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments

Secretary of State Kerry, Iranian Foreign Minister Zarif, and other diplomats from the P5+1 announce the framework agreement on Iran's nuclear program.

U.S. State Dept.

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Edge of Success? The Iranian Nuclear Negotiations and the Future Regional Order

Fri., Apr. 10, 2015 | 3:00pm - 5:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Taubman Building, Wiener Auditorium

The news released April 2nd about a framework agreement reached between Iran and the P5+1 heralds an important success in the diplomatic process to prevent Iran from pursuing a nuclear weapon. However, many questions about the deal's parameters, implementation and effects. This seminar will explore these questions and others relating to the announcement of the framework agreement.

This seminar will be open to Harvard students, staff, and faculty only, and will require an RSVP.

Special Series - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

And Then What? Imagining the Middle East if Nuclear Negotiations with Iran Fail

Wed., Feb. 4, 2015 | 12:00pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

As nuclear negotiations with Iran go into their second year, and the US congress considers a new sanctions bill, the chances of reaching a comprehensive settlement are highly uncertain. The number of regional and global actors with stakes in Iran’s nuclear trajectory means that a failure of negotiations would have far-reaching consequences. Different scenarios leading to the breakdown of talks could produce distinct pathways for the aftermath of diplomatic failure. In particular, whether or not negotiations end with the P5+1 united or divided will affect the prospects of further multilateral sanctions, as well as the behavior of Iran and its regional rivals.  The panel will examine these scenarios, and consider the consequences of a collapse of the negotiations for Iran’s nuclear policy, for regional politics and security, and for relations among the P5+1.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Transcending Mutual Deterrence in the U.S.-Russian Relationship

Thu., Oct. 3, 2013 | 10:15am - 11:45am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Russia and the United States ceased being mortal enemies with the end of Cold War. Yet a relationship based on the constant threat of mutual nuclear annihilation persists. Researchers from Harvard’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Russia’s Institute for U.S. and Canadian Studies teamed up in 2012 to write a report which explores whether their two countries can transcend the state of mutual deterrence. Even as this report was being written and edited, U.S.-Russian relations have warmed and chilled. The report, which will be presented at this seminar, assesses the central and enduring interests of the United States and Russia, the extent to which they coincide or conflict, and discerns whether or not in light of these interests mutual deterrence should remain a fundamental feature of the relationship.