11 Items

President Donald Trump speaks in the Cabinet Room of the White House on Sept. 12, 2017 (AP Photo/Alex Brandon).

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

Trump Is Going to Make a Huge Mistake on the Iran Deal

| Oct. 09, 2017

The Trump administration is right that Iranian behavior destabilizes the region, but wrong when it says that such behavior contradicts the “spirit” of the agreement and that he is therefore justified in refusing to certify Iran’s compliance. In fact, Iran’s troubling foreign policy is precisely why the deal was necessary in the first place: An Iran armed with a nuclear weapon would be far more threatening to regional and global security.

In this Dec. 8, 2012 photo, Chinese paramilitary policemen build a fence near a concrete marker depicting the North Korean and Chinese national flags with the words “China North Korea Border” at a crossing in the Chinese border town of Tumen in eastern China’s Jilin province. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)

AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File

Policy Brief

Peace and Prosperity on the Korean Peninsula

    Authors:
  • Hyun-Kyung Kim
  • Joy Li
  • Patrick Mayoh
  • Tom O'Bryan
    Editor:
  • Diana Park
| May 2017

North Korea is the most difficult and dangerous challenge facing the U.S. today. Pyongyang is on the path to developing a nuclear missile delivery system that could strike the United States. In fact, since 2013, the country has followed Kim Jong Un’s version of his grandfather’s “byungjin policy”, which stipulates that simultaneous nuclear expansion and economic development are necessary for the regime’s survival. North Korea shows no signs of abandoning its nuclear ambitions, which pose a mounting strategic threat to the Asia-Pacific region; the alternatives to a peaceful resolution are even more harrowing. Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula will require all stakeholders in Northeast Asia—South Korea, Japan, the United States, and especially China—to cooperate on measures that could help precipitate North Korea’s return to the negotiating table.

Audio - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Wendy Sherman on Office Hours Podcast

| Apr. 03, 2017

Former Undersecretary of State Wendy Sherman, a lead negotiator of the P5+1 Iran Nuclear deal and a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Belfer Center, talks with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about her place in history as the first female Undersecretary of State, Vladimir Putin’s sense of humor, and how many snacks it takes to fuel a negotiating team.

Video - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Wendy Sherman on Office Hours

| Apr. 03, 2017

Former Undersecretary of State Wendy Sherman, a lead negotiator of the P5+1 Iran Nuclear deal and a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Belfer Center, talks with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about her place in history as the first female Undersecretary of State, Vladimir Putin’s sense of humor, and how many snacks it takes to fuel a negotiating team.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton walks from her daughter Chelsea's apartment building Sunday, Sept. 11, 2016, in New York.

AP Photo/Craig Ruttle

Analysis & Opinions - TIME / time.com

Women Are Taught to Work Through Sickness and Pain

| September 13, 2016

Although Jen Palmieri, Hillary Clinton’s communications director, acknowledged that the campaign should have let the press know sooner that Secretary Clinton was fine, following her leaving the 9/11 memorial for health reasons on Sunday, working women have known for decades that even when you’re sick, you work. Mothers joke that they aren’t allowed to get sick, and advertisers rake in profits for cold and flu relievers that allow moms to go on doing their jobs. And women in the workplace, often judged for how strong or weak they are, regularly come to work even when they should be home in bed—even when society should allow for rest and recovery.

I learned this lesson early in life. During my early professional years, somehow my body knew it had to wait to get sick until it was time for annual leave. So I ended up spending my vacation time nursing bad sinus infections or flu, before flu shots. Later in my professional career, I simply learned to soldier on, no matter what.

West German Chancellor Willy Brandt kneels in front of a memorial at the site of the former Jewish Ghetto in Warsaw, Poland (7 December 1970).

AP Photo

Policy Brief - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

On Political Forgiveness: Some Preliminary Reflections

| June 2016

This policy brief examines political forgiveness, when countries or groups are able to reconcile or set aside historic enmities.

Ambassador Wendy Sherman makes the case that insights from frameworks of personal forgiveness can help nations seize the moment when their interests align and, accordingly, move to achieve political forgiveness. First, the process of forgiveness requires a sense of justice—victims must feel that perpetrators have been held accountable and will no longer be able to hurt them. It must also be a deep, extended undertaking: when perpetrators offer only superficial acknowledgments of the victims’ pain and attempt to move on quickly, victims perceive those efforts as perfunctory, even disingenuous.

Additionally, countries must reestablish genuine, ongoing contact to overcome narratives of “the other” that inhibit forgiveness. They should not assume, however, that political forgiveness will proceed as a linear, three-part process in which the perpetrator issues an apology, the victim accepts the apology, and the two subsequently cultivate their ties on the basis of aligned national interests.

The Hiroshima Peace Memorial in Hiroshima, Japan. Many are speculating whether President Obama will visit the city on his trip to Japan in May.

Dan Smith

Analysis & Opinions - CNN

President Obama, go to Hiroshima

| April 23, 2016

Secretary of State John Kerry made history earlier this month by becoming the first sitting cabinet official to visit Hiroshima, where he paid his respects to the victims of the atomic bomb dropped by the United States on the Japanese city at the end of World War II.

Kerry's visit was rich in symbolism, but the real question it triggered is whether President Obama will himself make a trip to Hiroshima when he travels to Japan in May. New reports indicate that Obama may indeed be planning such a trip. This would be a profound act, as no president, while in office, has ever visited the city, and the prospect of this president traveling there has already caused controversy at home and in Japan.

Following a discussion of the Iran nuclear deal at a Harvard Kennedy School JFK Jr. Forum in October, Ambassador Wendy Stewart speaks with a member of the audience.

(Photo by Martha Stewart)

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Center Welcomes Global Leaders

This fall, the Belfer Center welcomed a number of distinguished leaders as new senior fellows and visiting scholars. Eight new arrivals come from a range of high-profile public policy backgrounds, and each brings significant and varied expertise to Harvard Kennedy School and the Belfer Center.

Report - National Security Advisory Group

The U.S. Military: Under Strain and at Risk

| Jan. 25, 2006

The National Security Advisory Group sounds a warning, raising awareness about the state of our ground forces today and the very real risk that poses to our future security. The group also proposes an action plan for restoring the health and vitality of the U.S. military.