Best Practices and Training

FEATURED ITEMS

Advancing Nuclear Security: Evaluating Progress and Setting New Goals
March 2014 | Report
Harvard Kennedy School | Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
By Matthew Bunn, Martin B. Malin, Nickolas Roth, and William H. Tobey

"In the lead-up to the nuclear security summit in The Hague, Advancing Nuclear Security: Evaluating Progress and Setting New Goals outlines what was accomplished in a four-year effort launched in 2009 to secure nuclear material around the globe—and what remains to be done....The authors conclude that “all countries with nuclear weapons, separated plutonium, or highly enriched uranium (HEU) on their soil have more to do to ensure these items are effectively and lastingly secured.”  (click here to view)

A Worst Practices Guide to Insider Threats: Lessons from Past Mistakes
Paper | April 2014
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
By Matthew Bunn and Scott D. Sagan

In this paper, authors Matthew Bunn and Scott D. Sagan present a kind of “worst practices” guide of serious mistakes made in the past regarding insider threats. While each situation is unique, and serious insider problems are relatively rare, the incidents described reflect issues that exist in many contexts and that every nuclear security manager should consider. (click here to view)

Defining and Implementing Best Practices in Nuclear Security
December 2012 | Discussion Paper
Harvard Kennedy School | Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
By William H. Tobey

This paper analyzes the contribution that best practices can make to the field of nuclear security by defining what is meant by best practice; specifying a methodology for deriving it; understanding the resulting characteristics of the method; and comparing its pros and cons to other methods contributing to security, such as guidelines and regulations. (click here to view)

Building a Better International Nuclear Security Standard
March 2012 | Working Paper
U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS
By William H. Tobey

"This paper illustrates the threat of nuclear terrorism and argues that, with their years of experience, the United States and Russia should articulate a nuclear security “gold standard” to other states." (click here to view)

Strengthening Global Approaches to Nuclear Security
July 2013 | Conference Paper
Harvard Kennedy School | Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
By Matthew Bunn

This paper recommends learning from the much stronger national and international efforts in nuclear safety, and in particular taking steps to build international understanding of the threat; establish effective performance objectives; assure performance; train and certify needed personnel; build security culture and exchange best practices; reduce the number of sites that need to be protected; and strengthen the international framework and continue the dialogue once leaders are no longer meeting regularly at the summit level. (click here to view)

Preventing Insider Theft: Lessons from the Casino and Pharmaceutical Industries
June 2013 | Journal Article
Journal of Nuclear Materials Management
By Matthew Bunn and Kathryn M. Glynn

"Through structured interviews and a literature review, we assess which approaches to protection against insider thefts in the casino and pharmaceutical industries could be usefully applied to strengthen protections against insider theft in the nuclear industry, where insider thefts could have very high consequences. Among other measures, we suggest consideration of constant video surveillance of all vaults and insider-material interactions; frequent and rigorous material accounting; requiring everyone who touches material to sign for it; implementing an expanded two-person rule; rewarding attention to security; and establishing incident databases and experience sharing." (click here to view)

All Stocks of Weapons-Usable Nuclear Materials Worldwide Must be Protected Against Global Terrorist Threats
Winter 2011 | Journal Article
The Journal of Nuclear Materials Management
By Matthew Bunn and Evgeniy P. Malsin

This article argues countries should, at a minimum, protect against a baseline set of adversary capabilities that all stocks of nuclear weapons, plutonium, or HEU should be protected against, no matter what country they are in, including both insiders and outsiders and a range of potential tactics. It recommends that countries facing more substantial adversary threats put even more capable security systems in place. (click here to view)

OTHER RESOURCES

Nuclear Materials Security Education Module
March 2014 | Educational Resource
Nuclear Threat Initiative

"The module includes an introduction to nuclear materials security that would be covered in two class periods and includes a lecture outline with slides and a simulation exercise to develop students’ perspectives on nuclear materials security.  Students consider technical questions, policy issues, and engage in a discussion of sovereign versus global responsibilities." (click here to view)

Nuclear Security eLearning Course
January 2014 | Educational Resource
International Atomic Energy Agency

"The IAEA has developed an interactive computer based training course that is addressed to front-line officers, border guards, customs officials and law enforcement officers around the world using handheld radiation detection instruments." (click here to view)

Best Practice Guides
Publication Series
World Institute for Nuclear Security (WINS)

"Our BPGs offer practical, hands-on information on topics dealing with Nuclear Security Management. Each Guide also includes two Appendices that provide self-assessment questions and a maturity scale ranging from poor to outstanding. The appendices enable stakeholders to benchmark how well they and their organisation are doing in a particular area of security management and to understand what needs to be done to move to the next level." 

WINS Best Practice Guides are available to WINS members only (registration is free) and include series on:

  • Nuclear Security Programme Organisation
  • Managing and Communicating Security Information
  • People in Nuclear Security
  • Implementing Security Measures
  • Security of Radioactive Sources

The WINS Academy Strategy 2013-2015
March 2013 | Paper
World Institute for Nuclear Security (WINS)

"The [WINS Academy] Strategy sets out the programme specification for establishing a WINS Academy (hereafter referred to as the “Academy”) to promote nuclear security leadership and establish Nuclear Security Management as a recognised and regulated profession."

Reaching New Heights: Annual Report 2013
2013 | Report
World Institute for Nuclear Security

"The WINS Annual Reports present in-depth information about the people behind WINS, as well as about our membership, financial performance, projects, achievements and current strategy." (click here to view)

Value and Challenges of Regularized Consultations and Information Sharing Between Facility Security Managers
September 2012 | Workshop Paper
Nuclear Security Governance Experts Group
By Roger Howsley

"This paper examines the role of the Nuclear Facility Security Manager and the benefit to information sharing, which has as its objective the improvement of nuclear security effectiveness. It highlights potential obstacles and advantages to developing a much more dynamic and performance-based nuclear Security Programme and the need for demonstrable competence amongst nuclear security managers, who promote a broad and inclusive attitude towards security." (click here to view)

An Assessment of the Nuclear Security Centers of Excellence
May 2012 | Policy Analysis Brief
The Stanley Foundation
By Alan Heyes

"At the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, a number of countries announced they were establishing centers of excellence to provide technical, scientific, and educational support to assist in developing a robust “nuclear security culture,” both nationally and internationally....An assessment of the existing and planned centers indicates that much closer coordination and collaboration among the centers is needed in order to optimize their full potential and to ensure their long-term sustainability." (click here to view)

International Network for Nuclear Security Training and Support Centres (NSSC)
2012 | Online Resource
International Atomic Energy Agency

The mission of the International Network for Nuclear Security Training and Support Centres is, " to contribute to the global efforts to enhance nuclear security capacity building through an effective and collaborative network of nuclear security training and support centres." (click here to view)

The World Institute for Nuclear Security: Filling a Gap in the Global Nuclear Security Regime
Fall 2009 | Journal Article
Innovations
By Roger Howsley

"In September 2008, a new international institution was born—the World Institute for Nuclear Security (WINS). Mohammed ElBaradei, then the director-general of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), said that “WINS fills an urgent gap in our need to strengthen the nuclear security system.” But the key question is, what is that gap?" (click here to view)

International Best Practices in Nuclear Security Risk Management
May 2007 | Fact Sheet
Institute of Nuclear Materials Management

"Some degree of risk is associated with all human endeavors and this certainly includes nuclear material activities. Responsible stewardship of nuclear materials requires risk management. Risk management should be considered as the highest level of nuclear materials management. These best practices were identified, discussed, and documented at a workshop on international best practices in nuclear security risk management held in Washington, DC, in May 2007." (click here to view)

New Opportunities for Nuclear Security Best Practice Sharing - the Role of Centers of Excellence
Workshop Paper
Nuclear Security Governance Experts Group 
By Yoo Ho-sik

"Education and training are practical ways to help strengthen the security culture. However, there are few places that provide such programs related to nuclear security. Several countries including the ROK have pledged to establish the center of excellence during the [Nuclear Security] Summits. It is expected that Korea’s training center will play a significant role in strengthening the security culture by providing education and training for both those who work in nuclear field and the general public. The role of this center is not limited to just training and education. It can be used as a place for sharing past experiences and best practices. In this paper, the objectives and roles of the center will be discussed and suggestions will presented on ways to operate it efficiently." (click here to view)

Masters in Nuclear Security
Educational Resource
Delft University of Technology

"Nuclear power is getting renewed attention worldwide, because it can accommodate the growing need for electricity....At the same time we have become aware of the continuing threat and potential harmful acts with nuclear material....The Master in Nuclear Security provides a broad overview of the entire risk area. The scope of the course includes prevention and planning, detection of and response to unauthorized access, theft, sabotage, illegal transfer or other malicious acts involving nuclear material, other radioactive substances or their associated facilities." (click here to view)

International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN)
Online Resource
International Atomic Energy Agency

"At an IAEA workshop held in March 2010, a group of experts from academia, international organizations and professional nuclear material management associations established, under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Security Programme, the International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN). The network's mission is to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education." (click here to view)